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  • NationalitiesPapers.FinalVersionAnon.16June

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Nationalities Papers on 18/09/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00905992.2017.1347917

    Accepted author manuscript, 325 KB, PDF-document

    Embargo ends: 18/03/19

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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The Politics of Memory and Commemoration: Armenian Diasporic Reflections on 2015

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>01/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Nationalities Papers
Issue number1
Volume46
Number of pages21
Pages (from-to)123-143
<mark>State</mark>Published
Early online date18/09/17
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

The centenary year of the Armenian genocide witnessed an escalation in cultural production and both political and academic focus. This paper looks at some of the sites and spaces, physical and discursive, in which the centenary was marked. In particular, it seeks to assess how the centenary has challenged and possibly altered the context within which we approach the genocide and its continuing legacies. The paper is positioned in the diasporic space – while recognizing that this is fluid and embodies transnational sites between “homelands” in the form of Armenia and Turkey, and “host states” where diaspora communities have resided (at least) since the genocide, in effect their homes. This paper attempts to pick out some of the themes apparent in the discourse and in the activities during 2015, from the perspective of Armenian diasporan actors, and is based on the author’s observations and participation in centenary events in the USA, Lebanon, Turkey, Switzerland, and the UK, as well as interviews with participants and organizers.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Nationalities Papers on 18/09/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/00905992.2017.1347917