Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > The relationship between smoking, quitting smok...
View graph of relations

The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach. / Au, Nicole; Hauck, Katharina; Hollingsworth, Bruce.

In: Applied Economics, Vol. 45, No. 16, 2013, p. 2191-2199.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Au, Nicole ; Hauck, Katharina ; Hollingsworth, Bruce. / The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach. In: Applied Economics. 2013 ; Vol. 45, No. 16. pp. 2191-2199.

Bibtex

@article{8a6e4d87fd8c4a639cf3a7f57b059d7c,
title = "The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach",
abstract = "Smoking and obesity are two leading causes of preventable death. Further understanding of the relationship between these two risk factors can assist in reducing avoidable morbidity and mortality. This study investigates the empirical association between obesity and the propensity to smoke and to quit smoking, using a Seemingly Unrelated (SUR) probit approach that takes into consideration the potential for reverse causality and unobserved heterogeneity. Using Australian health survey data, this article demonstrates the usefulness of the SUR probit approach in generating information on the relationship between unobserved factors influencing both smoking behaviour and obesity, and in providing estimates of the conditional probabilities of each risk factor. Results suggest the two risk factors are not independent. The presence, size and direction of correlation between the unobserved factors are found to vary by smoking behaviour and by gender. Estimates of conditional probabilities demonstrate smokers have a lower probability of obesity, particularly among females, and ex-smokers have a higher probability of obesity, particularly among males. These findings suggest that health policies targeted at one risk factor may have unintended implications for the other.",
keywords = "obesity, body mass index , smoking , smoking cessation , seemingly unrelated probit",
author = "Nicole Au and Katharina Hauck and Bruce Hollingsworth",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/00036846.2012.657353",
language = "English",
volume = "45",
pages = "2191--2199",
journal = "Applied Economics",
issn = "0003-6846",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "16",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The relationship between smoking, quitting smoking and obesity in Australia: a seemingly unrelated probit approach

AU - Au, Nicole

AU - Hauck, Katharina

AU - Hollingsworth, Bruce

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - Smoking and obesity are two leading causes of preventable death. Further understanding of the relationship between these two risk factors can assist in reducing avoidable morbidity and mortality. This study investigates the empirical association between obesity and the propensity to smoke and to quit smoking, using a Seemingly Unrelated (SUR) probit approach that takes into consideration the potential for reverse causality and unobserved heterogeneity. Using Australian health survey data, this article demonstrates the usefulness of the SUR probit approach in generating information on the relationship between unobserved factors influencing both smoking behaviour and obesity, and in providing estimates of the conditional probabilities of each risk factor. Results suggest the two risk factors are not independent. The presence, size and direction of correlation between the unobserved factors are found to vary by smoking behaviour and by gender. Estimates of conditional probabilities demonstrate smokers have a lower probability of obesity, particularly among females, and ex-smokers have a higher probability of obesity, particularly among males. These findings suggest that health policies targeted at one risk factor may have unintended implications for the other.

AB - Smoking and obesity are two leading causes of preventable death. Further understanding of the relationship between these two risk factors can assist in reducing avoidable morbidity and mortality. This study investigates the empirical association between obesity and the propensity to smoke and to quit smoking, using a Seemingly Unrelated (SUR) probit approach that takes into consideration the potential for reverse causality and unobserved heterogeneity. Using Australian health survey data, this article demonstrates the usefulness of the SUR probit approach in generating information on the relationship between unobserved factors influencing both smoking behaviour and obesity, and in providing estimates of the conditional probabilities of each risk factor. Results suggest the two risk factors are not independent. The presence, size and direction of correlation between the unobserved factors are found to vary by smoking behaviour and by gender. Estimates of conditional probabilities demonstrate smokers have a lower probability of obesity, particularly among females, and ex-smokers have a higher probability of obesity, particularly among males. These findings suggest that health policies targeted at one risk factor may have unintended implications for the other.

KW - obesity

KW - body mass index

KW - smoking

KW - smoking cessation

KW - seemingly unrelated probit

U2 - 10.1080/00036846.2012.657353

DO - 10.1080/00036846.2012.657353

M3 - Journal article

VL - 45

SP - 2191

EP - 2199

JO - Applied Economics

JF - Applied Economics

SN - 0003-6846

IS - 16

ER -