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The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz.

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The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz. / Mackenzie, Adrian.

In: Time and Society, Vol. 10, No. 2, 09.2001, p. 235-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Mackenzie, A 2001, 'The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz.', Time and Society, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 235-258.

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Vancouver

Author

Mackenzie, Adrian. / The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz. In: Time and Society. 2001 ; Vol. 10, No. 2. pp. 235-258.

Bibtex

@article{3c389306d3244e21af0a8c59672c0f00,
title = "The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz.",
abstract = "In modern social and critical theory, clocks have figured as the embodiment of social order or, more ominously, as an exemplar of the threat posed to living thought by technology. As an alternative to such a bipolar evaluation, this paper examines the technicity of clocktime. The concept of technicity was suggested by the French philosopher, Gilbert Simondon. It is way of understanding the mode of existence of technical objects ontogenetically, that is, in terms of how they come to be rather than what they are. This paper introduces an ontogenetic account of clocktime as a new capacity to articulate diverse geographical, economic, technical and political realities together. It explains the convoluted precision of contemporary clocktime ensembles as just such an articulation. It discusses an ineliminable residue of metastability in the increasing precision of clocktime.",
keywords = "GPS • pendulum clock • Simondon • time",
author = "Adrian Mackenzie",
year = "2001",
month = sep
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "235--258",
journal = "Time and Society",
issn = "0961-463X",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The technicity of time : from 1.00 oscillations/sec to 9,192,631,770 Hz.

AU - Mackenzie, Adrian

PY - 2001/9

Y1 - 2001/9

N2 - In modern social and critical theory, clocks have figured as the embodiment of social order or, more ominously, as an exemplar of the threat posed to living thought by technology. As an alternative to such a bipolar evaluation, this paper examines the technicity of clocktime. The concept of technicity was suggested by the French philosopher, Gilbert Simondon. It is way of understanding the mode of existence of technical objects ontogenetically, that is, in terms of how they come to be rather than what they are. This paper introduces an ontogenetic account of clocktime as a new capacity to articulate diverse geographical, economic, technical and political realities together. It explains the convoluted precision of contemporary clocktime ensembles as just such an articulation. It discusses an ineliminable residue of metastability in the increasing precision of clocktime.

AB - In modern social and critical theory, clocks have figured as the embodiment of social order or, more ominously, as an exemplar of the threat posed to living thought by technology. As an alternative to such a bipolar evaluation, this paper examines the technicity of clocktime. The concept of technicity was suggested by the French philosopher, Gilbert Simondon. It is way of understanding the mode of existence of technical objects ontogenetically, that is, in terms of how they come to be rather than what they are. This paper introduces an ontogenetic account of clocktime as a new capacity to articulate diverse geographical, economic, technical and political realities together. It explains the convoluted precision of contemporary clocktime ensembles as just such an articulation. It discusses an ineliminable residue of metastability in the increasing precision of clocktime.

KW - GPS • pendulum clock • Simondon • time

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

SP - 235

EP - 258

JO - Time and Society

JF - Time and Society

SN - 0961-463X

IS - 2

ER -