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The World in Pictures.

Research output: Other contribution

Published

Publication date15/09/2005
Original languageEnglish

Bibliographic note

Special Individual Circumstances. Etchells directed the performance and wrote text for this work, developing it with members of the regular Forced Entertainment ensemble. This work takes up the inquiry into relations with the audience and contemporary modes of story-telling and is focused around an absurd and often comical and problematic attempt to tell the 'story of mankind' from the cavemen to the present day. The dynamic relationship between the performers on-stage in this piece is that of one 'narrator' and a team of performers whose task appears to be that of enacting or 'bringing to life' the narrative. The piece explores the problematic nature of shared historical narrative and the difficulties of rendering already distant events in language and image. As Bloody Mess drew on theatrical or performance clich', The World In Pictures focuses its attention on the clich's and commonplaces of picture-book history. Alongside the 'historical' material The World In Pictures stages a number of more intimate scenes, often centred around performer Jerry Killick, whose material affords him a much more calm and direct relationship with the audience. In the alternation of this mode and the more disrupted (and already self-sabotaging) texts from the piece's other narrator (Terry O'Connor), The World In Pictures continues exploration of the economies of address to the audience and the dynamics of the relationship between stage and auditorium and the simultaneously libidinous and destructive force both play in live performance. Each of the works functions as an evening in theatre space; each is also, by another conception, a kind of actional essay on the problem and possibilities of performance itself. Reviews from The Guardian, The Times and Variety are available from the Forced Entertainment website. RAE_import_type : Performance RAE_uoa_type : LICA