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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Staver, A.C., Brando, P.M., Barlow, J., Morton, D.C., Paine, C.T., Malhi, Y., Araujo Murakami, A. and del Aguila, Pasquel, J. (2020), Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. Ecol Lett, 23: 99-106. doi:10.1111/ele.13409 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ele.13409 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire

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Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. / Staver, A.C.; Brando, P.M.; Barlow, J.; Morton, D.C.; Paine, C.E.T.; Malhi, Y.; Araujo Murakami, A.; del Aguila Pasquel, J.

In: Ecology Letters, Vol. 23, No. 1, 31.01.2020, p. 99-106.

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Harvard

Staver, AC, Brando, PM, Barlow, J, Morton, DC, Paine, CET, Malhi, Y, Araujo Murakami, A & del Aguila Pasquel, J 2020, 'Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire', Ecology Letters, vol. 23, no. 1, pp. 99-106. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13409

APA

Staver, A. C., Brando, P. M., Barlow, J., Morton, D. C., Paine, C. E. T., Malhi, Y., Araujo Murakami, A., & del Aguila Pasquel, J. (2020). Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. Ecology Letters, 23(1), 99-106. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13409

Vancouver

Staver AC, Brando PM, Barlow J, Morton DC, Paine CET, Malhi Y et al. Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. Ecology Letters. 2020 Jan 31;23(1):99-106. https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.13409

Author

Staver, A.C. ; Brando, P.M. ; Barlow, J. ; Morton, D.C. ; Paine, C.E.T. ; Malhi, Y. ; Araujo Murakami, A. ; del Aguila Pasquel, J. / Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. In: Ecology Letters. 2020 ; Vol. 23, No. 1. pp. 99-106.

Bibtex

@article{121b9dbe7a774757b6409dc9e8dfb8f4,
title = "Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire",
abstract = "Understory fires represent an accelerating threat to Amazonian tropical forests and can, during drought, affect larger areas than deforestation itself. These fires kill trees at rates varying from < 10 to c. 90% depending on fire intensity, forest disturbance history and tree functional traits. Here, we examine variation in bark thickness across the Amazon. Bark can protect trees from fires, but it is often assumed to be consistently thin across tropical forests. Here, we show that investment in bark varies, with thicker bark in dry forests and thinner in wetter forests. We also show that thinner bark translated into higher fire‐driven tree mortality in wetter forests, with between 0.67 and 5.86 gigatonnes CO2 lost in Amazon understory fires between 2001 and 2010. Trait‐enabled global vegetation models that explicitly include variation in bark thickness are likely to improve the predictions of fire effects on carbon cycling in tropical forests.",
keywords = "carbon cycle, Amazonia, tree mortality, tropical forest, functional traits",
author = "A.C. Staver and P.M. Brando and J. Barlow and D.C. Morton and C.E.T. Paine and Y. Malhi and {Araujo Murakami}, A. and {del Aguila Pasquel}, J.",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Staver, A.C., Brando, P.M., Barlow, J., Morton, D.C., Paine, C.T., Malhi, Y., Araujo Murakami, A. and del Aguila, Pasquel, J. (2020), Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. Ecol Lett, 23: 99-106. doi:10.1111/ele.13409 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ele.13409 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "31",
doi = "10.1111/ele.13409",
language = "English",
volume = "23",
pages = "99--106",
journal = "Ecology Letters",
issn = "1461-023X",
publisher = "Wiley",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire

AU - Staver, A.C.

AU - Brando, P.M.

AU - Barlow, J.

AU - Morton, D.C.

AU - Paine, C.E.T.

AU - Malhi, Y.

AU - Araujo Murakami, A.

AU - del Aguila Pasquel, J.

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Staver, A.C., Brando, P.M., Barlow, J., Morton, D.C., Paine, C.T., Malhi, Y., Araujo Murakami, A. and del Aguila, Pasquel, J. (2020), Thinner bark increases sensitivity of wetter Amazonian tropical forests to fire. Ecol Lett, 23: 99-106. doi:10.1111/ele.13409 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ele.13409 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2020/1/31

Y1 - 2020/1/31

N2 - Understory fires represent an accelerating threat to Amazonian tropical forests and can, during drought, affect larger areas than deforestation itself. These fires kill trees at rates varying from < 10 to c. 90% depending on fire intensity, forest disturbance history and tree functional traits. Here, we examine variation in bark thickness across the Amazon. Bark can protect trees from fires, but it is often assumed to be consistently thin across tropical forests. Here, we show that investment in bark varies, with thicker bark in dry forests and thinner in wetter forests. We also show that thinner bark translated into higher fire‐driven tree mortality in wetter forests, with between 0.67 and 5.86 gigatonnes CO2 lost in Amazon understory fires between 2001 and 2010. Trait‐enabled global vegetation models that explicitly include variation in bark thickness are likely to improve the predictions of fire effects on carbon cycling in tropical forests.

AB - Understory fires represent an accelerating threat to Amazonian tropical forests and can, during drought, affect larger areas than deforestation itself. These fires kill trees at rates varying from < 10 to c. 90% depending on fire intensity, forest disturbance history and tree functional traits. Here, we examine variation in bark thickness across the Amazon. Bark can protect trees from fires, but it is often assumed to be consistently thin across tropical forests. Here, we show that investment in bark varies, with thicker bark in dry forests and thinner in wetter forests. We also show that thinner bark translated into higher fire‐driven tree mortality in wetter forests, with between 0.67 and 5.86 gigatonnes CO2 lost in Amazon understory fires between 2001 and 2010. Trait‐enabled global vegetation models that explicitly include variation in bark thickness are likely to improve the predictions of fire effects on carbon cycling in tropical forests.

KW - carbon cycle

KW - Amazonia

KW - tree mortality

KW - tropical forest

KW - functional traits

U2 - 10.1111/ele.13409

DO - 10.1111/ele.13409

M3 - Letter

VL - 23

SP - 99

EP - 106

JO - Ecology Letters

JF - Ecology Letters

SN - 1461-023X

IS - 1

ER -