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Tomorrow’s cities today: the power of urban visions

Research output: Exhibits, objects and web-based outputsExhibition

Published

Standard

Tomorrow’s cities today : the power of urban visions. Dunn, Nick (Artist); Cureton, Paul (Artist); Francis, Nick (Artist). 2015. Ukraine.

Research output: Exhibits, objects and web-based outputsExhibition

Harvard

Dunn, N, Cureton, P & Francis, N, Tomorrow’s cities today: the power of urban visions, 2015, Exhibition, Ukraine.

APA

Dunn, N. (Artist), Cureton, P. (Artist), & Francis, N. (Artist). (2015). Tomorrow’s cities today: the power of urban visions. Exhibition, . Retrieved from http://izolyatsia.org/en/project/au/tomorrow-cities/

Vancouver

Dunn N (Artist), Cureton P (Artist), Francis N (Artist). Tomorrow’s cities today: the power of urban visions Ukraine: . 2015.

Author

Dunn, Nick (Artist) ; Cureton, Paul (Artist) ; Francis, Nick (Artist). / Tomorrow’s cities today : the power of urban visions. [Exhibition].

Bibtex

@misc{5f1412e2411c4eb090181196f0e3e2e4,
title = "Tomorrow{\textquoteright}s cities today: the power of urban visions",
abstract = "Today we are faced with an increasingly urbanised world with 54 percent of the global population now living in developed areas. By 2050 projections indicate continued urbanisation and population growth will add another 2.5 billion people to our city conurbations. Cities throughout the world are planning and shaping up to this eventuality. As we progress into the 21st century, the pressure exerted on existing infrastructure systems, housing density, energy needs, space and socio-economic provision will pose a significant challenge to our urban populations. How do we reinvent cities in decline? What makes our thriving cities great? How do we realise sustainable growth and keep our cities healthy and convivial places to live, work and play? What might our cities look like in ten, twenty or fifty years? What kind of lifestyles may evolve and how will we move around, where will we live and work? The exhibition explores the visual depiction of future cities over the last 100 years, what such projects sought to communicate and why. Representations of future cities can play a significant role in shaping our thinking on cities and our future urban strategies since they contribute to a wider discourse and enable us to both think and look forward. ",
author = "Nick Dunn and Paul Cureton and Nick Francis",
year = "2015",
month = jul
day = "23",
language = "English",

}

RIS

TY - ADVS

T1 - Tomorrow’s cities today

T2 - the power of urban visions

A2 - Dunn, Nick

A2 - Cureton, Paul

A2 - Francis, Nick

PY - 2015/7/23

Y1 - 2015/7/23

N2 - Today we are faced with an increasingly urbanised world with 54 percent of the global population now living in developed areas. By 2050 projections indicate continued urbanisation and population growth will add another 2.5 billion people to our city conurbations. Cities throughout the world are planning and shaping up to this eventuality. As we progress into the 21st century, the pressure exerted on existing infrastructure systems, housing density, energy needs, space and socio-economic provision will pose a significant challenge to our urban populations. How do we reinvent cities in decline? What makes our thriving cities great? How do we realise sustainable growth and keep our cities healthy and convivial places to live, work and play? What might our cities look like in ten, twenty or fifty years? What kind of lifestyles may evolve and how will we move around, where will we live and work? The exhibition explores the visual depiction of future cities over the last 100 years, what such projects sought to communicate and why. Representations of future cities can play a significant role in shaping our thinking on cities and our future urban strategies since they contribute to a wider discourse and enable us to both think and look forward.

AB - Today we are faced with an increasingly urbanised world with 54 percent of the global population now living in developed areas. By 2050 projections indicate continued urbanisation and population growth will add another 2.5 billion people to our city conurbations. Cities throughout the world are planning and shaping up to this eventuality. As we progress into the 21st century, the pressure exerted on existing infrastructure systems, housing density, energy needs, space and socio-economic provision will pose a significant challenge to our urban populations. How do we reinvent cities in decline? What makes our thriving cities great? How do we realise sustainable growth and keep our cities healthy and convivial places to live, work and play? What might our cities look like in ten, twenty or fifty years? What kind of lifestyles may evolve and how will we move around, where will we live and work? The exhibition explores the visual depiction of future cities over the last 100 years, what such projects sought to communicate and why. Representations of future cities can play a significant role in shaping our thinking on cities and our future urban strategies since they contribute to a wider discourse and enable us to both think and look forward.

M3 - Exhibition

CY - Ukraine

ER -