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Toward a typology of constative speech acts: actions beyond evidentiality, epistemic modality, and factuality

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Toward a typology of constative speech acts : actions beyond evidentiality, epistemic modality, and factuality. / Tantucci, Vittorio.

In: Intercultural Pragmatics, Vol. 13, No. 2, 07.06.2016, p. 181-209.

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@article{70a68467ff5b4fa194726eb8467824ca,
title = "Toward a typology of constative speech acts: actions beyond evidentiality, epistemic modality, and factuality",
abstract = "The present study joins the long-running debate about the semantic– pragmatic distinction of the three domains of epistemic modality, evidentiality, and factuality. In particular, this work aims at providing both a theoretical and operational framework to investigate what type of speech act is at stake when a speaker/writer alternatively decides to mark a proposition as an epistemic modal, an evidential, or a factual construction. In fact, three basic types of illocutionary force will be shown to determine the modal marking of a constative speech act: evaluational (EvF(p)), presentative (PrF(p)), and assertive (AsF(p)) force. This classification is based on a set of tests that can effectively address either grammaticalized constructions or pragmatic strategies, independent from the specificity of the item under enquiry. This approach is first used to disen- tangle the controversial meaning of MUST-type predicates and then further theorized as a speech-act based framework of epistemic disambiguation.",
keywords = "speech acts, constatives, evidentiality, epistemic modality, factuality, assertion",
author = "Vittorio Tantucci",
year = "2016",
month = jun,
day = "7",
doi = "10.1515/ip-2016-0008",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "181--209",
journal = "Intercultural Pragmatics",
issn = "1612-295X",
publisher = "Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co. KG",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Toward a typology of constative speech acts

T2 - actions beyond evidentiality, epistemic modality, and factuality

AU - Tantucci, Vittorio

PY - 2016/6/7

Y1 - 2016/6/7

N2 - The present study joins the long-running debate about the semantic– pragmatic distinction of the three domains of epistemic modality, evidentiality, and factuality. In particular, this work aims at providing both a theoretical and operational framework to investigate what type of speech act is at stake when a speaker/writer alternatively decides to mark a proposition as an epistemic modal, an evidential, or a factual construction. In fact, three basic types of illocutionary force will be shown to determine the modal marking of a constative speech act: evaluational (EvF(p)), presentative (PrF(p)), and assertive (AsF(p)) force. This classification is based on a set of tests that can effectively address either grammaticalized constructions or pragmatic strategies, independent from the specificity of the item under enquiry. This approach is first used to disen- tangle the controversial meaning of MUST-type predicates and then further theorized as a speech-act based framework of epistemic disambiguation.

AB - The present study joins the long-running debate about the semantic– pragmatic distinction of the three domains of epistemic modality, evidentiality, and factuality. In particular, this work aims at providing both a theoretical and operational framework to investigate what type of speech act is at stake when a speaker/writer alternatively decides to mark a proposition as an epistemic modal, an evidential, or a factual construction. In fact, three basic types of illocutionary force will be shown to determine the modal marking of a constative speech act: evaluational (EvF(p)), presentative (PrF(p)), and assertive (AsF(p)) force. This classification is based on a set of tests that can effectively address either grammaticalized constructions or pragmatic strategies, independent from the specificity of the item under enquiry. This approach is first used to disen- tangle the controversial meaning of MUST-type predicates and then further theorized as a speech-act based framework of epistemic disambiguation.

KW - speech acts

KW - constatives

KW - evidentiality

KW - epistemic modality

KW - factuality

KW - assertion

U2 - 10.1515/ip-2016-0008

DO - 10.1515/ip-2016-0008

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

SP - 181

EP - 209

JO - Intercultural Pragmatics

JF - Intercultural Pragmatics

SN - 1612-295X

IS - 2

ER -