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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Clinical Psychology Review. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Clinical Psychology Review, 52, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.01.002

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Towards recovery-oriented psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder: quality of life outcomes, stage-sensitive treatments, and mindfulness mechanisms

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>03/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Clinical Psychology Review
Volume52
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)148-163
Publication statusPublished
Early online date17/01/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Current adjunctive psychosocial interventions for bipolar disorder (BD) aim to impact illness course via information sharing/skill development. This focus on clinical outcomes contrasts with the emergent recovery paradigm, which prioritises adaptation to serious mental illness and movement towards personally meaningful goals. The aim of this review is to encourage innovation in the psychological management of BD by considering three recovery-oriented trends in the literature. First, the importance of quality of life as a target of recovery-oriented clinical work is considered. Second, the recent staging approach to BD is described, and we outline implications for psychosocial interventions tailored to stage. Finally, we review evidence suggesting that mindfulness-based psychosocial interventions have potential across early, middle and late stages of BD. It is concluded that the humanistic emphasis of the recovery paradigm provides a timely stimulus for development of a next generation of psychosocial treatments for people with BD.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Clinical Psychology Review. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Clinical Psychology Review, 52, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.cpr.2017.01.002