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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Dagnan D, Masson J, Thwaites R, James A, Hatton C. Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:760–767. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12427 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12427/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. / Dagnan, Dave; Masson, John; Thwaites, Richard; James, Amy; Hatton, Chris.

In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 31, No. 5, 09.2018, p. 760-767.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Dagnan, D, Masson, J, Thwaites, R, James, A & Hatton, C 2018, 'Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services', Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 760-767. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12427

APA

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Dagnan, Dave ; Masson, John ; Thwaites, Richard ; James, Amy ; Hatton, Chris. / Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities. 2018 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 760-767.

Bibtex

@article{e2202b4c4c714d06b33775219db51d4e,
title = "Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Current policy in the England suggests that people with intellectual disabilities should, where possible, access mainstream mental health services; this should include access to mainstream therapy services. It is likely that mainstream therapists will need training and support to work with people with intellectual disabilities.METHOD: Sixty-eight therapists working in an English Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service received one- or 2-day training on working with people with intellectual disabilities. Measures of confidence, general therapeutic self-efficacy and attitudes to people with intellectual disabilities' use of mainstream mental health services were completed pre-training, post-training and at 3-month follow-up; at which time, 12 participants were interviewed about the impact of the training on their practice.RESULTS: There was a significant positive change in all measures immediately post-training which was maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Training considerations for mainstream therapists who may work with people with intellectual disabilities are discussed.",
keywords = "confidence, improving access to psychological therapies, intellectual disability, psychological therapy, training",
author = "Dave Dagnan and John Masson and Richard Thwaites and Amy James and Chris Hatton",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Dagnan D, Masson J, Thwaites R, James A, Hatton C. Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:760–767. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12427 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12427/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2018",
month = sep
doi = "10.1111/jar.12427",
language = "English",
volume = "31",
pages = "760--767",
journal = "Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities",
issn = "1360-2322",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services

AU - Dagnan, Dave

AU - Masson, John

AU - Thwaites, Richard

AU - James, Amy

AU - Hatton, Chris

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Dagnan D, Masson J, Thwaites R, James A, Hatton C. Training therapists to work with people with intellectual disability in Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) services. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:760–767. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12427 which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jar.12427/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2018/9

Y1 - 2018/9

N2 - BACKGROUND: Current policy in the England suggests that people with intellectual disabilities should, where possible, access mainstream mental health services; this should include access to mainstream therapy services. It is likely that mainstream therapists will need training and support to work with people with intellectual disabilities.METHOD: Sixty-eight therapists working in an English Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service received one- or 2-day training on working with people with intellectual disabilities. Measures of confidence, general therapeutic self-efficacy and attitudes to people with intellectual disabilities' use of mainstream mental health services were completed pre-training, post-training and at 3-month follow-up; at which time, 12 participants were interviewed about the impact of the training on their practice.RESULTS: There was a significant positive change in all measures immediately post-training which was maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Training considerations for mainstream therapists who may work with people with intellectual disabilities are discussed.

AB - BACKGROUND: Current policy in the England suggests that people with intellectual disabilities should, where possible, access mainstream mental health services; this should include access to mainstream therapy services. It is likely that mainstream therapists will need training and support to work with people with intellectual disabilities.METHOD: Sixty-eight therapists working in an English Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) service received one- or 2-day training on working with people with intellectual disabilities. Measures of confidence, general therapeutic self-efficacy and attitudes to people with intellectual disabilities' use of mainstream mental health services were completed pre-training, post-training and at 3-month follow-up; at which time, 12 participants were interviewed about the impact of the training on their practice.RESULTS: There was a significant positive change in all measures immediately post-training which was maintained at 3-month follow-up.CONCLUSIONS: Training considerations for mainstream therapists who may work with people with intellectual disabilities are discussed.

KW - confidence

KW - improving access to psychological therapies

KW - intellectual disability

KW - psychological therapy

KW - training

U2 - 10.1111/jar.12427

DO - 10.1111/jar.12427

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29152833

VL - 31

SP - 760

EP - 767

JO - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

JF - Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities

SN - 1360-2322

IS - 5

ER -