Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we ...
View graph of relations

Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we learn from population-based studies?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Standard

Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we learn from population-based studies? / Emerson, Eric.

In: Children and Society, Vol. 26, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 214-222.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Emerson, Eric. / Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we learn from population-based studies?. In: Children and Society. 2012 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 214-222.

Bibtex

@article{5c79f2990ce348b6a28daf4289d7aef1,
title = "Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we learn from population-based studies?",
abstract = "This article illustrates the potential value of undertaking secondary analyses of large-scale population-based survey data to better inform our understanding of disabled childhoods. It is argued that while such approaches can never address the lived experience of growing up with disability, they can provide valuable insights into the ways in which the social and environmental contexts of disabled childhoods can compound (or redress) the disadvantage and inequality faced by disabled children.",
keywords = "disability, poverty , socioeconomic position , surveys",
author = "Eric Emerson",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1111/j.1099-0860.2012.00434.x",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "214--222",
journal = "Children and Society",
issn = "0951-0605",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Understanding disabled childhoods: What can we learn from population-based studies?

AU - Emerson, Eric

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - This article illustrates the potential value of undertaking secondary analyses of large-scale population-based survey data to better inform our understanding of disabled childhoods. It is argued that while such approaches can never address the lived experience of growing up with disability, they can provide valuable insights into the ways in which the social and environmental contexts of disabled childhoods can compound (or redress) the disadvantage and inequality faced by disabled children.

AB - This article illustrates the potential value of undertaking secondary analyses of large-scale population-based survey data to better inform our understanding of disabled childhoods. It is argued that while such approaches can never address the lived experience of growing up with disability, they can provide valuable insights into the ways in which the social and environmental contexts of disabled childhoods can compound (or redress) the disadvantage and inequality faced by disabled children.

KW - disability

KW - poverty

KW - socioeconomic position

KW - surveys

U2 - 10.1111/j.1099-0860.2012.00434.x

DO - 10.1111/j.1099-0860.2012.00434.x

M3 - Journal article

VL - 26

SP - 214

EP - 222

JO - Children and Society

JF - Children and Society

SN - 0951-0605

IS - 3

ER -