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  • Accepted_BJET_Understanding_Nomadic_Collaborative_Learning_Groups_final

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ryberg, T., Davidsen, J. and Hodgson, V. (2018), Understanding nomadic collaborative learning groups. Br J Educ Technol, 49: 235–247. doi:10.1111/bjet.12584/ which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjet.12584/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Understanding Nomadic Collaborative Learning Groups

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>03/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>British Journal of Educational Technology
Issue number2
Volume49
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)235-247
Publication statusPublished
Early online date14/09/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The paper builds on the work of Rossito et al. (2014) on collaborative nomadic work to develop three categories of practice of nomadic collaborative learning groups. Our study is based on interviews, workshops and observations of two undergraduate student’s group practices engaged in self-organised, long-term collaborations within the frame of Problem and Project Based Learning. By analysing the patterns of nomadic collaborative learning we identify and discuss how the two groups of students incorporate mobile and digital technologies as well as physical and/or non-digital technologies into their group work. Specifically, we identify the following categories of nomadic collaborative learning practices: ‘orchestration of work phases, spaces and activities’, ‘the orchestration of multiple technologies’ and ‘orchestration of togetherness’. We found that for both groups of students there was a fluidity, situatedness and improvisational aspect to how they negotiate the orchestration of their work. Their ways of utilising space, places, technologies and activities over time was a complex interweaving of the digital and physical. We conclude by suggesting that the three categories of practice identified are important for deepening our understanding of nomadic collaborative learning groups.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Ryberg, T., Davidsen, J. and Hodgson, V. (2018), Understanding nomadic collaborative learning groups. Br J Educ Technol, 49: 235–247. doi:10.1111/bjet.12584/ which has been published in final form at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bjet.12584/abstract This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.