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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Scientific Studies of Reading on 12/01/2016, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10888438.2015.1092973

    Accepted author manuscript, 218 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY: Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

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Understanding of idiomatic expressions in context in skilled and less-skilled comprehenders: online processing and interpretation

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>03/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>Scientific Studies of Reading
Issue number2
Volume20
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)124-139
Publication statusPublished
Early online date12/01/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This paper reports a study in which good and poor comprehenders (between 8 to 10 years) read short passages containing phrases that could be interpreted as idiomatic or not, depending on the context. Familiarity was manipulated by including real (English) idioms and novel (translations of Italian) idioms. Reading times for the target phrases were measured and the children’s understanding of the target expressions was assessed. The older children and better comprehenders were more likely to interpret idiomatic phrases correctly. In particular, there was an interaction between age and meaning condition: the younger children were less able to choose an appropriate interpretation of the figurative expressions. In general, children spent relatively more time reading the idiomatic expressions than the literal ones, with the exception of less-skilled comprehenders when presented with novel (Italian) idioms. They seemed not to appreciate that these expressions needed any particular effort for interpretation.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Scientific Studies of Reading on 12/01/2016, available online: http://wwww.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10888438.2015.1092973