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    Rights statement: © Copyright 2018 Canadian Psychological Association. All rights reserved. "This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the CPA journal. It is not the copy of record."

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Unveiling the Truth: The Effect of Muslim Garments and Face Covering on the Perceived Credibility of a Victim’s Court Testimony

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Unveiling the Truth : The Effect of Muslim Garments and Face Covering on the Perceived Credibility of a Victim’s Court Testimony. / Fahmy, Weyam; Snook, Brent; Luther, Kirk; McCardle, Meagan.

In: Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science, 23.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Vancouver

Fahmy W, Snook B, Luther K, McCardle M. Unveiling the Truth: The Effect of Muslim Garments and Face Covering on the Perceived Credibility of a Victim’s Court Testimony. Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science. 2018 Aug 23. Available from, DOI: 10.1037/cbs0000116

Author

Fahmy, Weyam ; Snook, Brent ; Luther, Kirk ; McCardle, Meagan. / Unveiling the Truth : The Effect of Muslim Garments and Face Covering on the Perceived Credibility of a Victim’s Court Testimony. In: Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science. 2018

Bibtex

@article{9296b7af22f247d08ac4d1692a9d6072,
title = "Unveiling the Truth: The Effect of Muslim Garments and Face Covering on the Perceived Credibility of a Victim’s Court Testimony",
abstract = "The perceived credibility of a sexual assault victim’s court testimony was examined. A 2 (Face Covered: No, Yes) x 2 (Muslim Garment: No, Yes) between-participant design was used. Participants (N = 120) were assigned to watch one of four videos of a sexual assault victim providing testimony, and asked to rate her credibility. The effect of Muslim Garment on victim credibility ratings was significant; the victim was perceived as more credible when she wore a niqab or hijab compared to when she did not wear either of these garments. The effect of Face Covering on credibility ratings was non-significant, and the interaction was non-significant. The implications for women who wear Muslim garments while testifying about sexual assault are discussed.",
author = "Weyam Fahmy and Brent Snook and Kirk Luther and Meagan McCardle",
note = "{\circledC} Copyright 2018 Canadian Psychological Association. All rights reserved. {"}This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the CPA journal. It is not the copy of record.{"}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "23",
doi = "10.1037/cbs0000116",
language = "English",
journal = "Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science",
issn = "0008-400X",
publisher = "Canadian Psychological Association",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Unveiling the Truth

T2 - Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science

AU - Fahmy,Weyam

AU - Snook,Brent

AU - Luther,Kirk

AU - McCardle,Meagan

N1 - © Copyright 2018 Canadian Psychological Association. All rights reserved. "This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the CPA journal. It is not the copy of record."

PY - 2018/8/23

Y1 - 2018/8/23

N2 - The perceived credibility of a sexual assault victim’s court testimony was examined. A 2 (Face Covered: No, Yes) x 2 (Muslim Garment: No, Yes) between-participant design was used. Participants (N = 120) were assigned to watch one of four videos of a sexual assault victim providing testimony, and asked to rate her credibility. The effect of Muslim Garment on victim credibility ratings was significant; the victim was perceived as more credible when she wore a niqab or hijab compared to when she did not wear either of these garments. The effect of Face Covering on credibility ratings was non-significant, and the interaction was non-significant. The implications for women who wear Muslim garments while testifying about sexual assault are discussed.

AB - The perceived credibility of a sexual assault victim’s court testimony was examined. A 2 (Face Covered: No, Yes) x 2 (Muslim Garment: No, Yes) between-participant design was used. Participants (N = 120) were assigned to watch one of four videos of a sexual assault victim providing testimony, and asked to rate her credibility. The effect of Muslim Garment on victim credibility ratings was significant; the victim was perceived as more credible when she wore a niqab or hijab compared to when she did not wear either of these garments. The effect of Face Covering on credibility ratings was non-significant, and the interaction was non-significant. The implications for women who wear Muslim garments while testifying about sexual assault are discussed.

U2 - 10.1037/cbs0000116

DO - 10.1037/cbs0000116

M3 - Journal article

JO - Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science

JF - Canadian Journal of Behavioural Science

SN - 0008-400X

ER -