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Usage Fluctuation Analysis: A new way of analysing shifts in historical discourse

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Usage Fluctuation Analysis : A new way of analysing shifts in historical discourse. / McEnery, Anthony; Brezina, Vaclav; Baker, Helen.

In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics, Vol. 24, No. 4, 01.12.2019, p. 413-444.

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McEnery, Anthony ; Brezina, Vaclav ; Baker, Helen. / Usage Fluctuation Analysis : A new way of analysing shifts in historical discourse. In: International Journal of Corpus Linguistics. 2019 ; Vol. 24, No. 4. pp. 413-444.

Bibtex

@article{241d55a886794a86ab59fb5f840dea53,
title = "Usage Fluctuation Analysis: A new way of analysing shifts in historical discourse",
abstract = "This article introduces a methodology for the diachronic analysis of large historical corpora, Usage Fluctuation Analysis (UFA). UFA looks at the fluctuation of the usage of a word as observed through collocation. It presupposes neither a commitment to a specific semantic theory, nor that the results will focus solely on semantics. We focus, rather, upon a word{\textquoteright}s usage. UFA considers large amounts of evidence about usage, through time, as made available by historical corpora, displaying fluctuation in word usage in the form of a graph. The paper provides guidelines for the interpretation of UFA graphs and provides three short case studies applying the technique to (i) the analysis of the word its and (ii) two words related to social actors, WHORE and HARLOT. These case studies relate UFA to prior, labour intensive, corpus and historical analyses. They also highlight the novel observations that the technique affords.",
keywords = "collocation, time series data, usage change, Early Modern English, non-parametric regression",
author = "Anthony McEnery and Vaclav Brezina and Helen Baker",
year = "2019",
month = dec
day = "1",
doi = "10.1075/ijcl.18096.mce",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "413--444",
journal = "International Journal of Corpus Linguistics",
issn = "1384-6655",
publisher = "John Benjamins Publishing Company",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Usage Fluctuation Analysis

T2 - A new way of analysing shifts in historical discourse

AU - McEnery, Anthony

AU - Brezina, Vaclav

AU - Baker, Helen

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - This article introduces a methodology for the diachronic analysis of large historical corpora, Usage Fluctuation Analysis (UFA). UFA looks at the fluctuation of the usage of a word as observed through collocation. It presupposes neither a commitment to a specific semantic theory, nor that the results will focus solely on semantics. We focus, rather, upon a word’s usage. UFA considers large amounts of evidence about usage, through time, as made available by historical corpora, displaying fluctuation in word usage in the form of a graph. The paper provides guidelines for the interpretation of UFA graphs and provides three short case studies applying the technique to (i) the analysis of the word its and (ii) two words related to social actors, WHORE and HARLOT. These case studies relate UFA to prior, labour intensive, corpus and historical analyses. They also highlight the novel observations that the technique affords.

AB - This article introduces a methodology for the diachronic analysis of large historical corpora, Usage Fluctuation Analysis (UFA). UFA looks at the fluctuation of the usage of a word as observed through collocation. It presupposes neither a commitment to a specific semantic theory, nor that the results will focus solely on semantics. We focus, rather, upon a word’s usage. UFA considers large amounts of evidence about usage, through time, as made available by historical corpora, displaying fluctuation in word usage in the form of a graph. The paper provides guidelines for the interpretation of UFA graphs and provides three short case studies applying the technique to (i) the analysis of the word its and (ii) two words related to social actors, WHORE and HARLOT. These case studies relate UFA to prior, labour intensive, corpus and historical analyses. They also highlight the novel observations that the technique affords.

KW - collocation

KW - time series data

KW - usage change

KW - Early Modern English

KW - non-parametric regression

U2 - 10.1075/ijcl.18096.mce

DO - 10.1075/ijcl.18096.mce

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 413

EP - 444

JO - International Journal of Corpus Linguistics

JF - International Journal of Corpus Linguistics

SN - 1384-6655

IS - 4

ER -