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  • Halliday_BrabazonEmploymentSchemeGlasgow_FCH_pre-print version

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Family and Community History on 26/09/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14631180.2017.1369256

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Useful work for idle hands or a brightening and elevating influence?: The introduction of the Brabazon Employment Scheme to Glasgow's public institutions in the late 19th century

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>10/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Family and Community History
Issue number2
Volume20
Number of pages12
Pages (from-to)145-156
Publication statusPublished
Early online date26/09/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Women’s ability to effect changes in welfare policy during the later workings of the new Poor Law has been presented as a ‘marginal influence’ within past historiography. This perspective is contested in recent empirical work, which argues for a more positive view of female agency. The Brabazon Employment Scheme was a charitable initiative, which occupied the poor unable to take part in the routine work of public institutions. Findings from its operation in Glasgow demonstrate how women drew upon philanthropic experience as well as elected positions in the management of institutions to secure the scheme’s introduction in these settings. While the initiative originated in the English workhouses, local women extended the Brabazon activities to address gaps in welfare provision for asylum patients. In doing so, the article shows how organised charity continued to function as an avenue of support for the poor alongside municipal relief into the early 20th century.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Family and Community History on 26/09/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/14631180.2017.1369256