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Users’ experiences of an online intervention for bipolar disorder: important lessons for design and evaluation

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Users’ experiences of an online intervention for bipolar disorder : important lessons for design and evaluation. / Dodd, Alyson Lamont; Mallinson, Sara Louise; Griffiths, Martin James; Morriss, Richard; Jones, Steven Huntley; Lobban, Anne Fiona.

In: Evidence-Based Mental Health, Vol. 20, No. 4, 23.10.2017, p. 133-139.

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@article{687bdc1e1f6e469b9eaf7857e92b16c6,
title = "Users{\textquoteright} experiences of an online intervention for bipolar disorder: important lessons for design and evaluation",
abstract = "Background The evidence base for digital interventions for physical and mental health, including severe and enduring mental health difficulties, is increasing. In a feasibility trial, web-based Enhanced Relapse Prevention (ERPonline) for bipolar disorder demonstrated high recruitment and retention rates. Relative to participants in the waitlist control group, those who received ERPonline showed increased monitoring for early warning signs of relapse and had developed more positive illness models.Objective To understand users{\textquoteright} motivations and barriers for taking part in an online/telephone-based trial, and for engagement with ERPonline.Methods Participants from the trial who had been allocated to receive ERPonline were purposively sampled to participate in telephone-based, in-depth qualitative interviews about their experiences. Interviews (n=19) were analysed using framework analysis to identify themes relevant to study aims.Findings Participants took part due to the convenient, flexible and rewarding aspects of the trial design, as well as a desire to improve the mental health of themselves and others. Barriers included extensive assessments, practical difficulties and mood. ERPonline was was generally considered to be accessible, relevant and straightforward, but there were individual preferences regarding design, content and who it was for. Several participants reported positive changes, but there was a sense that digital interventions should not replace routine care.Conclusions There are a number of barriers and facilitators to consider when evaluating and implementing digital interventions. Individual preferences and human contact were key factors for both trial design and engagement with an online intervention.Clinical implications Digital intervention",
author = "Dodd, {Alyson Lamont} and Mallinson, {Sara Louise} and Griffiths, {Martin James} and Richard Morriss and Jones, {Steven Huntley} and Lobban, {Anne Fiona}",
year = "2017",
month = oct,
day = "23",
doi = "10.1136/eb-2017-102754",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "133--139",
journal = "Evidence-Based Mental Health",
issn = "1362-0347",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Users’ experiences of an online intervention for bipolar disorder

T2 - important lessons for design and evaluation

AU - Dodd, Alyson Lamont

AU - Mallinson, Sara Louise

AU - Griffiths, Martin James

AU - Morriss, Richard

AU - Jones, Steven Huntley

AU - Lobban, Anne Fiona

PY - 2017/10/23

Y1 - 2017/10/23

N2 - Background The evidence base for digital interventions for physical and mental health, including severe and enduring mental health difficulties, is increasing. In a feasibility trial, web-based Enhanced Relapse Prevention (ERPonline) for bipolar disorder demonstrated high recruitment and retention rates. Relative to participants in the waitlist control group, those who received ERPonline showed increased monitoring for early warning signs of relapse and had developed more positive illness models.Objective To understand users’ motivations and barriers for taking part in an online/telephone-based trial, and for engagement with ERPonline.Methods Participants from the trial who had been allocated to receive ERPonline were purposively sampled to participate in telephone-based, in-depth qualitative interviews about their experiences. Interviews (n=19) were analysed using framework analysis to identify themes relevant to study aims.Findings Participants took part due to the convenient, flexible and rewarding aspects of the trial design, as well as a desire to improve the mental health of themselves and others. Barriers included extensive assessments, practical difficulties and mood. ERPonline was was generally considered to be accessible, relevant and straightforward, but there were individual preferences regarding design, content and who it was for. Several participants reported positive changes, but there was a sense that digital interventions should not replace routine care.Conclusions There are a number of barriers and facilitators to consider when evaluating and implementing digital interventions. Individual preferences and human contact were key factors for both trial design and engagement with an online intervention.Clinical implications Digital intervention

AB - Background The evidence base for digital interventions for physical and mental health, including severe and enduring mental health difficulties, is increasing. In a feasibility trial, web-based Enhanced Relapse Prevention (ERPonline) for bipolar disorder demonstrated high recruitment and retention rates. Relative to participants in the waitlist control group, those who received ERPonline showed increased monitoring for early warning signs of relapse and had developed more positive illness models.Objective To understand users’ motivations and barriers for taking part in an online/telephone-based trial, and for engagement with ERPonline.Methods Participants from the trial who had been allocated to receive ERPonline were purposively sampled to participate in telephone-based, in-depth qualitative interviews about their experiences. Interviews (n=19) were analysed using framework analysis to identify themes relevant to study aims.Findings Participants took part due to the convenient, flexible and rewarding aspects of the trial design, as well as a desire to improve the mental health of themselves and others. Barriers included extensive assessments, practical difficulties and mood. ERPonline was was generally considered to be accessible, relevant and straightforward, but there were individual preferences regarding design, content and who it was for. Several participants reported positive changes, but there was a sense that digital interventions should not replace routine care.Conclusions There are a number of barriers and facilitators to consider when evaluating and implementing digital interventions. Individual preferences and human contact were key factors for both trial design and engagement with an online intervention.Clinical implications Digital intervention

U2 - 10.1136/eb-2017-102754

DO - 10.1136/eb-2017-102754

M3 - Journal article

VL - 20

SP - 133

EP - 139

JO - Evidence-Based Mental Health

JF - Evidence-Based Mental Health

SN - 1362-0347

IS - 4

ER -