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Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving. / Litchfield, Damien; Ball, Linden J.

In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , Vol. 64, No. 4, 2011, p. 649-656.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Litchfield, D & Ball, LJ 2011, 'Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving', The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , vol. 64, no. 4, pp. 649-656. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2011.558628

APA

Litchfield, D., & Ball, L. J. (2011). Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology , 64(4), 649-656. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2011.558628

Vancouver

Litchfield D, Ball LJ. Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving. The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology . 2011;64(4):649-656. https://doi.org/10.1080/17470218.2011.558628

Author

Litchfield, Damien ; Ball, Linden J. / Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving. In: The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology . 2011 ; Vol. 64, No. 4. pp. 649-656.

Bibtex

@article{0e81b4e9d3e54352abf934ca6f652669,
title = "Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving",
abstract = "Research has shown that implicitly guiding attention via visual cues or unrelated tasks can increase the likelihood of solving insight problems. We examined whether following another person making specific skin-crossing saccades could induce similar attentional shifts and increase solution rates for Duncker's ((1945)) radiation problem. We presented 150 participants with one of three 30-s eye movement patterns from another problem solver: (a) focusing solely on the central tumour; (b) naturally making skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles; or (c) making deliberate skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles. Following another person making skin-crossing saccades increased the likelihood of solving the radiation problem. Our results demonstrate that another person's eye movements can promote attentional shifts that trigger insight problem solving.",
keywords = "Insight, Problem solving, Gaze following, Embodied cognition, Attentional guidance, EYE-MOVEMENTS, SHARED GAZE, ATTENTION, COGNITION, PERFORMANCE, THOUGHT, SEARCH",
author = "Damien Litchfield and Ball, {Linden J.}",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1080/17470218.2011.558628",
language = "English",
volume = "64",
pages = "649--656",
journal = "The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology ",
issn = "1747-0218",
publisher = "Psychology Press Ltd",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using another's gaze as an explicit aid to insight problem solving

AU - Litchfield, Damien

AU - Ball, Linden J.

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - Research has shown that implicitly guiding attention via visual cues or unrelated tasks can increase the likelihood of solving insight problems. We examined whether following another person making specific skin-crossing saccades could induce similar attentional shifts and increase solution rates for Duncker's ((1945)) radiation problem. We presented 150 participants with one of three 30-s eye movement patterns from another problem solver: (a) focusing solely on the central tumour; (b) naturally making skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles; or (c) making deliberate skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles. Following another person making skin-crossing saccades increased the likelihood of solving the radiation problem. Our results demonstrate that another person's eye movements can promote attentional shifts that trigger insight problem solving.

AB - Research has shown that implicitly guiding attention via visual cues or unrelated tasks can increase the likelihood of solving insight problems. We examined whether following another person making specific skin-crossing saccades could induce similar attentional shifts and increase solution rates for Duncker's ((1945)) radiation problem. We presented 150 participants with one of three 30-s eye movement patterns from another problem solver: (a) focusing solely on the central tumour; (b) naturally making skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles; or (c) making deliberate skin-crossing saccades between the outside area and the tumour from multiple angles. Following another person making skin-crossing saccades increased the likelihood of solving the radiation problem. Our results demonstrate that another person's eye movements can promote attentional shifts that trigger insight problem solving.

KW - Insight

KW - Problem solving

KW - Gaze following

KW - Embodied cognition

KW - Attentional guidance

KW - EYE-MOVEMENTS

KW - SHARED GAZE

KW - ATTENTION

KW - COGNITION

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - THOUGHT

KW - SEARCH

U2 - 10.1080/17470218.2011.558628

DO - 10.1080/17470218.2011.558628

M3 - Journal article

VL - 64

SP - 649

EP - 656

JO - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

JF - The Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology

SN - 1747-0218

IS - 4

ER -