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Using bluetooth device names to support interaction in smart environments

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

Publication date22/06/2009
Host publicationProceedings of the 7th international conference on Mobile systems, applications, and services (MobiSys '09)
Place of publicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages151-164
Number of pages14
ISBN (Print)978-1-60558-566-6
Original languageEnglish

Conference

ConferenceMobisys '09: Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Mobile systems, applications, and services
CityKrakow, Poland
Period22/06/0925/06/09

Conference

ConferenceMobisys '09: Proceedings of the 7th international conference on Mobile systems, applications, and services
CityKrakow, Poland
Period22/06/0925/06/09

Abstract

An increasing trend in mobile and pervasive computing is the augmentation of everyday public spaces with local computation -- leading to so called smart environments. However, there are no well accepted techniques for supporting spontaneous interaction between mobile users and these smart environments, though a wide range of techniques have been explored ranging from gesture recognition to downloading applications to a user's phone. In this paper we explore an approach to supporting such interaction based on the use of Bluetooth Device (user-friendly) Names as a control channel between users' mobile phones and computational resources in their local environment. Such an approach has many advantages over existing techniques though it is not without limitations. Our work focuses specifically on the use of Device Names to control and customize applications on large public displays in a campus environment. This paper describes our basic approach, a number of applications that we have constructed using this technique and the results of our evaluation work which has included a range of user studies and field trials. The paper concludes with an assessment of the viability of using our approach for interaction scenarios involving mobile users and computationally rich environments.

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