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  • Critical visual literacy and picture books.21.1.19

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Papen, U. (2019) Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools: challenges of a dialogic approach. Literacy, https://doi.org/10.1111/lit.12197 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/lit.12197 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

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    Embargo ends: 7/06/21

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Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools: challenges of a dialogic approach

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Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools : challenges of a dialogic approach. / Papen, Uta.

In: Literacy, 07.06.2019.

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@article{4c7f8dff02f24e6ca2b90e20d079cecf,
title = "Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools: challenges of a dialogic approach",
abstract = "This paper presents findings from a collaborative project on critical visual literacy in primary schools.In the project, we (a researcher and a teacher) implemented a series of picture book discussions with children in years 5 and 6. Our first aim was to developthe children’s ability to analyse the visual images in picture books and how authors/illustrators use these, together with writing, to communicate specific ideas.The second aim was to promote a dialogic lesson in which the children would lead the talk. In the paper, I discuss the challenges we faced in reaching our aims.My data include observation notes and audio recordings of the sessions and of discussions with the children. In the analysis, I examine the roles we took on, for example, as extenders and clarifiers of the children’s talk. However, unbeknown to us at the start, our two project aims turned out to be in conflict with each other. While the children enjoyed looking closely at the pictures and discussing the books’ possible meanings, without repeated questions and prompts, they focused on the book as story not on how it was constructed by the author and illustrator. This required a more teacher-focused approach than what we had planned.",
keywords = "picture books, classroom talk, response to literature, literacy, critical literacy",
author = "Uta Papen",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Papen, U. (2019) Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools: challenges of a dialogic approach. Literacy, https://doi.org/10.1111/lit.12197 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/lit.12197 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1111/lit.12197",
language = "English",
journal = "Literacy",
issn = "1741-4350",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools

T2 - challenges of a dialogic approach

AU - Papen, Uta

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Papen, U. (2019) Using picture books to develop critical visual literacy in primary schools: challenges of a dialogic approach. Literacy, https://doi.org/10.1111/lit.12197 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/lit.12197 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2019/6/7

Y1 - 2019/6/7

N2 - This paper presents findings from a collaborative project on critical visual literacy in primary schools.In the project, we (a researcher and a teacher) implemented a series of picture book discussions with children in years 5 and 6. Our first aim was to developthe children’s ability to analyse the visual images in picture books and how authors/illustrators use these, together with writing, to communicate specific ideas.The second aim was to promote a dialogic lesson in which the children would lead the talk. In the paper, I discuss the challenges we faced in reaching our aims.My data include observation notes and audio recordings of the sessions and of discussions with the children. In the analysis, I examine the roles we took on, for example, as extenders and clarifiers of the children’s talk. However, unbeknown to us at the start, our two project aims turned out to be in conflict with each other. While the children enjoyed looking closely at the pictures and discussing the books’ possible meanings, without repeated questions and prompts, they focused on the book as story not on how it was constructed by the author and illustrator. This required a more teacher-focused approach than what we had planned.

AB - This paper presents findings from a collaborative project on critical visual literacy in primary schools.In the project, we (a researcher and a teacher) implemented a series of picture book discussions with children in years 5 and 6. Our first aim was to developthe children’s ability to analyse the visual images in picture books and how authors/illustrators use these, together with writing, to communicate specific ideas.The second aim was to promote a dialogic lesson in which the children would lead the talk. In the paper, I discuss the challenges we faced in reaching our aims.My data include observation notes and audio recordings of the sessions and of discussions with the children. In the analysis, I examine the roles we took on, for example, as extenders and clarifiers of the children’s talk. However, unbeknown to us at the start, our two project aims turned out to be in conflict with each other. While the children enjoyed looking closely at the pictures and discussing the books’ possible meanings, without repeated questions and prompts, they focused on the book as story not on how it was constructed by the author and illustrator. This required a more teacher-focused approach than what we had planned.

KW - picture books

KW - classroom talk

KW - response to literature

KW - literacy

KW - critical literacy

U2 - 10.1111/lit.12197

DO - 10.1111/lit.12197

M3 - Journal article

JO - Literacy

JF - Literacy

SN - 1741-4350

ER -