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Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices

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Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices. / Roberts, Jonny; Bagci, Ibrahim Ethem; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Yasir; Young, Matthew; Woodhead, Christopher; Missous, Mohammed; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, Utz; Young, Robert James.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 5, 16456 , 10.11.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Roberts, J, Bagci, IE, Zawawi, MAM, Sexton, J, Hulbert, N, Noori, Y, Young, M, Woodhead, C, Missous, M, Migliorato, MA, Roedig, U & Young, RJ 2015, 'Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices', Scientific Reports, vol. 5, 16456 . https://doi.org/10.1038/srep16456

APA

Vancouver

Roberts J, Bagci IE, Zawawi MAM, Sexton J, Hulbert N, Noori Y et al. Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices. Scientific Reports. 2015 Nov 10;5. 16456 . https://doi.org/10.1038/srep16456

Author

Roberts, Jonny ; Bagci, Ibrahim Ethem ; Zawawi, M. A. M. ; Sexton, J. ; Hulbert, N. ; Noori, Yasir ; Young, Matthew ; Woodhead, Christopher ; Missous, Mohammed ; Migliorato, M. A. ; Roedig, Utz ; Young, Robert James. / Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices. In: Scientific Reports. 2015 ; Vol. 5.

Bibtex

@article{a61fee3b771b4854875420c62acb6492,
title = "Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices",
abstract = "Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.",
author = "Jonny Roberts and Bagci, {Ibrahim Ethem} and Zawawi, {M. A. M.} and J. Sexton and N. Hulbert and Yasir Noori and Matthew Young and Christopher Woodhead and Mohammed Missous and Migliorato, {M. A.} and Utz Roedig and Young, {Robert James}",
year = "2015",
month = "11",
day = "10",
doi = "10.1038/srep16456",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using quantum confinement to uniquely identify devices

AU - Roberts, Jonny

AU - Bagci, Ibrahim Ethem

AU - Zawawi, M. A. M.

AU - Sexton, J.

AU - Hulbert, N.

AU - Noori, Yasir

AU - Young, Matthew

AU - Woodhead, Christopher

AU - Missous, Mohammed

AU - Migliorato, M. A.

AU - Roedig, Utz

AU - Young, Robert James

PY - 2015/11/10

Y1 - 2015/11/10

N2 - Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

AB - Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

U2 - 10.1038/srep16456

DO - 10.1038/srep16456

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

M1 - 16456

ER -