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Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to quantify geometrically necessary dislocation density at the nanoscale

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Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to quantify geometrically necessary dislocation density at the nanoscale. / Liang, X.Z.; Dodge, M.F.; Jiang, J.; Dong, H.B.

In: Ultramicroscopy, Vol. 197, 02.2019, p. 39-45.

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@article{34e2260d3331405db2986deeaa00d8db,
title = "Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to quantify geometrically necessary dislocation density at the nanoscale",
abstract = "It is challenging to quantify the geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density at the nanoscale using conventional electron backscatter diffraction due to its limited spatial resolution. To overcome this problem, in this study, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique is used to measure lattice orientation and to calculate the corresponding nanoscale GND density. Using the TKD method, a variation of GND density from 6 × 1014 to 1016 m−2 has been measured in a welded super duplex stainless steel sample. The distribution of dislocation density is shown to be in good agreement with transmission electron microscope (TEM) result. Compared with dislocation measurements obtained by TEM, the TKD–GND method is revealed to be a relatively accurate, fast and accessible method. {\textcopyright} 2018",
keywords = "EBSD, Geometrically necessary dislocations, Nanostructure, TEM, TKD, Geometry, Nanostructures, Nanotechnology, Scanning electron microscopy, Transmission electron microscopy, Distribution of dislocations, Electron back scatter diffraction, Geometrically necessary dislocation densities, Lattice orientations, Spatial resolution, Super duplex stainless steel, Diffraction",
author = "X.Z. Liang and M.F. Dodge and J. Jiang and H.B. Dong",
year = "2019",
month = feb
doi = "10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.11.011",
language = "English",
volume = "197",
pages = "39--45",
journal = "Ultramicroscopy",
issn = "0304-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Science B.V.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Using transmission Kikuchi diffraction in a scanning electron microscope to quantify geometrically necessary dislocation density at the nanoscale

AU - Liang, X.Z.

AU - Dodge, M.F.

AU - Jiang, J.

AU - Dong, H.B.

PY - 2019/2

Y1 - 2019/2

N2 - It is challenging to quantify the geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density at the nanoscale using conventional electron backscatter diffraction due to its limited spatial resolution. To overcome this problem, in this study, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique is used to measure lattice orientation and to calculate the corresponding nanoscale GND density. Using the TKD method, a variation of GND density from 6 × 1014 to 1016 m−2 has been measured in a welded super duplex stainless steel sample. The distribution of dislocation density is shown to be in good agreement with transmission electron microscope (TEM) result. Compared with dislocation measurements obtained by TEM, the TKD–GND method is revealed to be a relatively accurate, fast and accessible method. © 2018

AB - It is challenging to quantify the geometrically necessary dislocation (GND) density at the nanoscale using conventional electron backscatter diffraction due to its limited spatial resolution. To overcome this problem, in this study, the transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) technique is used to measure lattice orientation and to calculate the corresponding nanoscale GND density. Using the TKD method, a variation of GND density from 6 × 1014 to 1016 m−2 has been measured in a welded super duplex stainless steel sample. The distribution of dislocation density is shown to be in good agreement with transmission electron microscope (TEM) result. Compared with dislocation measurements obtained by TEM, the TKD–GND method is revealed to be a relatively accurate, fast and accessible method. © 2018

KW - EBSD

KW - Geometrically necessary dislocations

KW - Nanostructure

KW - TEM

KW - TKD

KW - Geometry

KW - Nanostructures

KW - Nanotechnology

KW - Scanning electron microscopy

KW - Transmission electron microscopy

KW - Distribution of dislocations

KW - Electron back scatter diffraction

KW - Geometrically necessary dislocation densities

KW - Lattice orientations

KW - Spatial resolution

KW - Super duplex stainless steel

KW - Diffraction

U2 - 10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.11.011

DO - 10.1016/j.ultramic.2018.11.011

M3 - Journal article

VL - 197

SP - 39

EP - 45

JO - Ultramicroscopy

JF - Ultramicroscopy

SN - 0304-3991

ER -