Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Violence, Selection and Infant Mortality in Congo

Electronic data

  • 1-s2.0-S0167629616304519-main

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Health Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Health Economics, 59, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.02.004

    Accepted author manuscript, 1.09 MB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Violence, Selection and Infant Mortality in Congo

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
Close
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>05/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Health Economics
Volume59
Number of pages25
Pages (from-to)153-177
Publication statusPublished
Early online date14/02/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This paper documents the effects of the recent civil war in the Democratic Republic of Congo on mortality both in utero and during the first year of life. It instruments for conflict intensity using a mineral price index, which exploits the exogenous variation in the potential value of mineral resources generated by changes in world mineral prices to predict the geographic distribution of the conflict. Using estimates of civil war exposure on mortality across male and female newborn to assess their relative health, it provides evidence of culling effect (in utero selection) as a consequence of in utero shocks.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Health Economics. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Health Economics, 59, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jhealeco.2018.02.004