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    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Malda Castillo J, Smith I, Morris L, Perez‐Algorta G. Violent incidents in a secure service for individuals with learning disabilities: Incident types, circumstances and staff responses. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:1164–1173. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12490 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12490 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 488 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 28/06/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Violent Incidents in a Secure Service for Individuals with Learning Disabilities: Incident Types, Circumstances and Staff Responses

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Issue number6
Volume31
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)1164-1173
Publication statusPublished
Early online date28/06/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Background: The issue of violence in secure services has long been recognised both in the UK and worldwide. However, there is currently scarce literature available about violence within Learning Disability (LD) secure settings.

Methods: Secondary data analysis was conducted on violent incidents, using information routinely collected by the staff over a one-year period.

Results: Physical assaults were the most frequent type of incident, the distribution in terms of days or months was homogenous and incidents were concentrated in the corridors, lounges, and dining rooms of secure facilities. Antipsychotic medication was not regularly prescribed. Generalised linear modelling analyses revealed significant predictors that increased the chances of seclusion and physical restraint, such as being female or directing the violence towards staff.

Conclusions: These findings can inform staff training on violence prevention, and suggest that increased ward-based supervision and enhanced use of psychological formulations may help in reducing violence within this service context.

Bibliographic note

This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Malda Castillo J, Smith I, Morris L, Perez‐Algorta G. Violent incidents in a secure service for individuals with learning disabilities: Incident types, circumstances and staff responses. J Appl Res Intellect Disabil. 2018;31:1164–1173. https://doi.org/10.1111/jar.12490 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jar.12490 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.