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VML* -- A Family of Languages for Variability Management in Software Product Lines

Research output: Contribution in Book/Report/ProceedingsPaper

Published

  • Steffen Zschaler
  • Pablo Sanchez
  • Joao Santos
  • Mauricio Alferez
  • Awais Rashid
  • Lidia Fuentes
  • Ana Moreira
  • Joao Araujo
  • Uira Kulesza
Publication date03/2010
Host publicationSoftware Language Engineering : Second International Conference, SLE 2009, Denver, CO, USA, October 5-6, 2009, Revised Selected Papers
EditorsMark van den Brand , Dragan Gaševic , Jeff Gray
Place of publicationBerlin
PublisherSpringer
Pages82-102
Number of pages21
ISBN (Print)978-3-642-12106-7
Original languageEnglish

Conference

ConferenceSoftware Language Engineering, 2nd Int'l Conf. (SLE 2009), Revised Selected Papers
Period1/01/00 → …

Publication series

NameLecture Notes in Computer Science
PublisherSpringer
Volume5969
ISSN (Print)0302-9743
ISSN (Electronic)1611-3349

Conference

ConferenceSoftware Language Engineering, 2nd Int'l Conf. (SLE 2009), Revised Selected Papers
Period1/01/00 → …

Abstract

Managing variability is a challenging issue in software-product-line engineering. A key part of variability management is the ability to express explicitly the relationship between variability models (expressing the variability in the problem space, for example using feature models) and other artefacts of the product line, for example, requirements models and architecture models. Once these relations have been made explicit, they can be used for a number of purposes, most importantly for product derivation, but also for the generation of trace links or for checking the consistency of a product-line architecture. This paper bootstraps techniques from product-line engineering to produce a family of languages for variability management for easing the creation of new members of the family of languages. We show that developing such language families is feasible and demonstrate the flexibility of our language family by applying it to the development of two variability-management languages.