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  • What_matters_for_human_development_in_rural_education_in_Turkey

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education on 29/06/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03057925.2017.1340150

    Accepted author manuscript, 605 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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What matters for rural teachers and communities?: Educational challenges in rural Turkey

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/09/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education
Number of pages16
Pages (from-to)686-701
Publication statusPublished
Early online date29/06/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This research aims to unearth the educational challenges experienced by teachers and communities in rural Turkey. The research employs Nancy Fraser’s three dimensional justice approach – distribution, recognition and participation – to frame these challenges and to argue that rural challenges go beyond economic rationalities and concerns of infrastructure and resources. The study draws its data from 29 in-depth interviews with 20 teachers working in 16 different villages; 9 interviews with community members; and 2 focus group interviews, 1 with rural dwelling women and the other with rural dwelling men. The findings point out four significant difficulties that impede community and educational development: scarcity of resources; insufficient understanding of social, cultural and economic contexts that constrain educational attempts; lack of collaboration between teacher and communities; and irrelevant education. The study concludes by scrutinising how these difficulties interact with one another and result in marginalisation or casting out of rural lives.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Compare: A Journal of Comparative and International Education on 29/06/2017, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/03057925.2017.1340150