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Who accesses befriending services near the end of life?: baseline results from a wait-list controlled trial (ELSA) of a volunteer befriending service in the last year of life

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@article{d6836f4a877a48f4a0a66568729f6419,
title = "Who accesses befriending services near the end of life?: baseline results from a wait-list controlled trial (ELSA) of a volunteer befriending service in the last year of life",
abstract = "Background: Volunteers are central to the provision of much end of life care, but their impact is little understood. Volunteer befriending services could work to reduce isolation, meet emotional needs and maintain a sense of communityconnectedness.The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of receiving care from a volunteer service plus usual care at improving quality of life than usual care alone for adults in the last year of life. Here we provide descriptivebaseline data on trial participants.Study participants: Patients (estimated to be in their last year of life) referred to volunteer befriending services across 11 end of life care providers in England.Study design and methods: A wait-list controlled trial, with participants randomly allocated to intervention (immediate receipt of volunteering intervention) or wait list arm (four week wait for intervention). Data collectionat baseline, 4, 8 (12) weeks: WHO QOL BREF, Loneliness scale, mMOS-SS, social networks. Intention to treat analysis includes fitting a linear mixed effect model to each outcome variable at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. ISRCTN 12929812",
author = "Walshe, {Catherine Elizabeth} and Payne, {Sheila Alison} and Preston, {Nancy Jean} and {Perez Algorta}, {Guillermo Daniel} and Dodd, {Steven Robert} and N. Ockenden and M. Hill",
year = "2016",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1177/0269216316646056",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
journal = "Palliative Medicine",
issn = "0269-2163",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Who accesses befriending services near the end of life?

T2 - baseline results from a wait-list controlled trial (ELSA) of a volunteer befriending service in the last year of life

AU - Walshe, Catherine Elizabeth

AU - Payne, Sheila Alison

AU - Preston, Nancy Jean

AU - Perez Algorta, Guillermo Daniel

AU - Dodd, Steven Robert

AU - Ockenden, N.

AU - Hill, M.

PY - 2016/6

Y1 - 2016/6

N2 - Background: Volunteers are central to the provision of much end of life care, but their impact is little understood. Volunteer befriending services could work to reduce isolation, meet emotional needs and maintain a sense of communityconnectedness.The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of receiving care from a volunteer service plus usual care at improving quality of life than usual care alone for adults in the last year of life. Here we provide descriptivebaseline data on trial participants.Study participants: Patients (estimated to be in their last year of life) referred to volunteer befriending services across 11 end of life care providers in England.Study design and methods: A wait-list controlled trial, with participants randomly allocated to intervention (immediate receipt of volunteering intervention) or wait list arm (four week wait for intervention). Data collectionat baseline, 4, 8 (12) weeks: WHO QOL BREF, Loneliness scale, mMOS-SS, social networks. Intention to treat analysis includes fitting a linear mixed effect model to each outcome variable at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. ISRCTN 12929812

AB - Background: Volunteers are central to the provision of much end of life care, but their impact is little understood. Volunteer befriending services could work to reduce isolation, meet emotional needs and maintain a sense of communityconnectedness.The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of receiving care from a volunteer service plus usual care at improving quality of life than usual care alone for adults in the last year of life. Here we provide descriptivebaseline data on trial participants.Study participants: Patients (estimated to be in their last year of life) referred to volunteer befriending services across 11 end of life care providers in England.Study design and methods: A wait-list controlled trial, with participants randomly allocated to intervention (immediate receipt of volunteering intervention) or wait list arm (four week wait for intervention). Data collectionat baseline, 4, 8 (12) weeks: WHO QOL BREF, Loneliness scale, mMOS-SS, social networks. Intention to treat analysis includes fitting a linear mixed effect model to each outcome variable at 4, 8 and 12 weeks. ISRCTN 12929812

U2 - 10.1177/0269216316646056

DO - 10.1177/0269216316646056

M3 - Meeting abstract

VL - 30

JO - Palliative Medicine

JF - Palliative Medicine

SN - 0269-2163

IS - 6

ER -