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Who lost what?: An analysis of myth, loss, and proximity in news coverage of the Steubenville rape

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Who lost what? An analysis of myth, loss, and proximity in news coverage of the Steubenville rape. / Gutsche Jr, Robert; Salkin, Erica.

In: Journalism, Vol. 17, No. 4, 01.05.2016, p. 456-473.

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@article{569f602363154839a0081713884b73ea,
title = "Who lost what?: An analysis of myth, loss, and proximity in news coverage of the Steubenville rape",
abstract = "This article extends previous research on the application of mythical news narratives in times of great community loss, death, or destruction by taking into account the role of perceived dominant news audiences. This article analyzes 6 months of coverage surrounding the 2012 rape of a 16-year-old girl by two teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio. The article argues audience proximity to news events contributes to the mythical archetypes used to explain everyday life.",
keywords = "Archetype, audiences, local news, myth, narrative, proximity, social media",
author = "{Gutsche Jr}, Robert and Erica Salkin",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/1464884914566195",
language = "English",
volume = "17",
pages = "456--473",
journal = "Journalism",
issn = "1464-8849",
publisher = "Sage",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Who lost what?

T2 - An analysis of myth, loss, and proximity in news coverage of the Steubenville rape

AU - Gutsche Jr, Robert

AU - Salkin, Erica

PY - 2016/5/1

Y1 - 2016/5/1

N2 - This article extends previous research on the application of mythical news narratives in times of great community loss, death, or destruction by taking into account the role of perceived dominant news audiences. This article analyzes 6 months of coverage surrounding the 2012 rape of a 16-year-old girl by two teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio. The article argues audience proximity to news events contributes to the mythical archetypes used to explain everyday life.

AB - This article extends previous research on the application of mythical news narratives in times of great community loss, death, or destruction by taking into account the role of perceived dominant news audiences. This article analyzes 6 months of coverage surrounding the 2012 rape of a 16-year-old girl by two teenage boys in Steubenville, Ohio. The article argues audience proximity to news events contributes to the mythical archetypes used to explain everyday life.

KW - Archetype

KW - audiences

KW - local news

KW - myth

KW - narrative

KW - proximity

KW - social media

U2 - 10.1177/1464884914566195

DO - 10.1177/1464884914566195

M3 - Journal article

VL - 17

SP - 456

EP - 473

JO - Journalism

JF - Journalism

SN - 1464-8849

IS - 4

ER -