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  • JBR Why good things dont happen [final pdf]

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 68, 6, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2014.12.007

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    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Why good things don’t happen: the micro-foundations of routines in the M&A process

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>06/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Business Research
Issue number6
Volume68
Number of pages15
Pages (from-to)1367-1381
Publication statusPublished
Early online date9/01/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Why do organizations reject favorable opportunities - why don't good things happen? To address this question, we examine companies that fail to proceed with major opportunities for strategic renewal. By focusing upon routines in 28 cases of reverse mergers and acquisitions decisions across three continents, the research uncovers the centrality of a hitherto overlooked process, the authorization routine. The characteristics of this routine, and its nested nature, are shown to be critical to whether favorable opportunities are progressed. These findings contribute to the mergers and acquisition literature by extending prior process models and to the routines literature by showing how links and interactions between different layers of routines, and the nature of the routine enactment itself, are important in affecting strategic outcomes.

Bibliographic note

Date of Acceptance: 16/12/2014 18 month embargo This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Business Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Business Research, 68, 6, 2015 DOI: 10.1016/j.jbusres.2014.12.007