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Why make "hate" a crime?

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Why make "hate" a crime? / Iganski, Paul.

In: Critical Social Policy, Vol. 19, No. 3, 08.1999, p. 386-395.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Harvard

Iganski, P 1999, 'Why make "hate" a crime?', Critical Social Policy, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 386-395. https://doi.org/10.1177/026101839901900306

APA

Vancouver

Iganski P. Why make "hate" a crime? Critical Social Policy. 1999 Aug;19(3):386-395. https://doi.org/10.1177/026101839901900306

Author

Iganski, Paul. / Why make "hate" a crime?. In: Critical Social Policy. 1999 ; Vol. 19, No. 3. pp. 386-395.

Bibtex

@article{6039a4e045744e8f8f078ff38fb066a2,
title = "Why make {"}hate{"} a crime?",
abstract = "Specific offences of racially aggravated crimes were established in Britain by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. A number of offences with a racial aggravation now attract a higher penalty than those without. The United States has a long experience of similar legislation. But critics of so-called {"}hate crime{"} laws in the US argue that the legislation has failed to fulfill expectations. It is therefore timely to ask what are the objectives behind the legislation in Britain, and what are the prospects for achieving them? This article argues that the most significant impact of the legislation is likely to be on the criminal justice agencies expected to deal with racially aggravated crime.",
author = "Paul Iganski",
year = "1999",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1177/026101839901900306",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "386--395",
journal = "Critical Social Policy",
issn = "0261-0183",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Why make "hate" a crime?

AU - Iganski, Paul

PY - 1999/8

Y1 - 1999/8

N2 - Specific offences of racially aggravated crimes were established in Britain by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. A number of offences with a racial aggravation now attract a higher penalty than those without. The United States has a long experience of similar legislation. But critics of so-called "hate crime" laws in the US argue that the legislation has failed to fulfill expectations. It is therefore timely to ask what are the objectives behind the legislation in Britain, and what are the prospects for achieving them? This article argues that the most significant impact of the legislation is likely to be on the criminal justice agencies expected to deal with racially aggravated crime.

AB - Specific offences of racially aggravated crimes were established in Britain by the Crime and Disorder Act 1998. A number of offences with a racial aggravation now attract a higher penalty than those without. The United States has a long experience of similar legislation. But critics of so-called "hate crime" laws in the US argue that the legislation has failed to fulfill expectations. It is therefore timely to ask what are the objectives behind the legislation in Britain, and what are the prospects for achieving them? This article argues that the most significant impact of the legislation is likely to be on the criminal justice agencies expected to deal with racially aggravated crime.

U2 - 10.1177/026101839901900306

DO - 10.1177/026101839901900306

M3 - Journal article

VL - 19

SP - 386

EP - 395

JO - Critical Social Policy

JF - Critical Social Policy

SN - 0261-0183

IS - 3

ER -