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Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET.

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Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET. / Donald, Ian; Taylor, Paul J.; Johnson, Sheena; Cooper, Cary; Cartwright, Susan; Robertson, Susannah.

In: International Journal of Stress Management, Vol. 12, No. 4, 11.2005, p. 409-423.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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Donald I, Taylor PJ, Johnson S, Cooper C, Cartwright S, Robertson S. Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET. International Journal of Stress Management. 2005 Nov;12(4):409-423.

Author

Donald, Ian ; Taylor, Paul J. ; Johnson, Sheena ; Cooper, Cary ; Cartwright, Susan ; Robertson, Susannah. / Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET. In: International Journal of Stress Management. 2005 ; Vol. 12, No. 4. pp. 409-423.

Bibtex

@article{a7f355cd4c534f8c962f23f913b65e52,
title = "Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET.",
abstract = "In this study (N = 16,001), the predictors of productivity (i.e., work performance)were investigated with A Shortened Stress Evaluation Tool (E. B. Faragher, C. L. Cooper, & S. Cartwright, 2004), which incorporates individual work stressors, stress outcomes (physical and psychological well-being), and commitment (both to and from an organization). Psychological well-being, commitment from the organization to the employee, and resources were found to be predictive. Physical health, individual work stressors (with the exception of resources), and commitment from the employee to the organization were not identified as important. The indings are discussed with reference to both previous and future research. The large sample size and broad range of occupations included suggest the findings are generalizable to other employee groupings. Implications for both stress and management theory are discussed.",
keywords = "stress, productivity, psychological well-being, commitment",
author = "Ian Donald and Taylor, {Paul J.} and Sheena Johnson and Cary Cooper and Susan Cartwright and Susannah Robertson",
year = "2005",
month = nov,
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "409--423",
journal = "International Journal of Stress Management",
issn = "1072-5245",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Work Environments, Stress, and Productivity: An Examination Using ASSET.

AU - Donald, Ian

AU - Taylor, Paul J.

AU - Johnson, Sheena

AU - Cooper, Cary

AU - Cartwright, Susan

AU - Robertson, Susannah

PY - 2005/11

Y1 - 2005/11

N2 - In this study (N = 16,001), the predictors of productivity (i.e., work performance)were investigated with A Shortened Stress Evaluation Tool (E. B. Faragher, C. L. Cooper, & S. Cartwright, 2004), which incorporates individual work stressors, stress outcomes (physical and psychological well-being), and commitment (both to and from an organization). Psychological well-being, commitment from the organization to the employee, and resources were found to be predictive. Physical health, individual work stressors (with the exception of resources), and commitment from the employee to the organization were not identified as important. The indings are discussed with reference to both previous and future research. The large sample size and broad range of occupations included suggest the findings are generalizable to other employee groupings. Implications for both stress and management theory are discussed.

AB - In this study (N = 16,001), the predictors of productivity (i.e., work performance)were investigated with A Shortened Stress Evaluation Tool (E. B. Faragher, C. L. Cooper, & S. Cartwright, 2004), which incorporates individual work stressors, stress outcomes (physical and psychological well-being), and commitment (both to and from an organization). Psychological well-being, commitment from the organization to the employee, and resources were found to be predictive. Physical health, individual work stressors (with the exception of resources), and commitment from the employee to the organization were not identified as important. The indings are discussed with reference to both previous and future research. The large sample size and broad range of occupations included suggest the findings are generalizable to other employee groupings. Implications for both stress and management theory are discussed.

KW - stress

KW - productivity

KW - psychological well-being

KW - commitment

M3 - Journal article

VL - 12

SP - 409

EP - 423

JO - International Journal of Stress Management

JF - International Journal of Stress Management

SN - 1072-5245

IS - 4

ER -