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World wide weed: global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

Published

Standard

World wide weed : global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control. / Decorte, Tom (Editor); Potter, Gary (Editor); Bouchard, Martin (Editor).

Aldershot : Ashgate, 2011. 314 p.

Research output: Book/Report/ProceedingsBook

Harvard

Decorte, T, Potter, G & Bouchard, M (eds) 2011, World wide weed: global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control. Ashgate, Aldershot.

APA

Decorte, T., Potter, G., & Bouchard, M. (Eds.) (2011). World wide weed: global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control. Aldershot: Ashgate.

Vancouver

Decorte T, (ed.), Potter G, (ed.), Bouchard M, (ed.). World wide weed: global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control. Aldershot: Ashgate, 2011. 314 p.

Author

Decorte, Tom (Editor) ; Potter, Gary (Editor) ; Bouchard, Martin (Editor). / World wide weed : global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control. Aldershot : Ashgate, 2011. 314 p.

Bibtex

@book{b9c4b14ccf3b426baabbbb12559b2125,
title = "World wide weed: global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control",
abstract = "For the majority of its history, the cultivation of cannabis did not stand out, at least compared to the cultivation of other illegal plants. Cannabis plantations, like coca bush or opium poppy plantations, were typically large in size, grown by local farmers in a handful of developing (producing) countries, processed and then exported to industrial (consuming) nations. While cocaine and heroin are still produced in a handful of developing countries, cannabis cultivation is increasingly universal. From Europe to the Americas and Oceania, import substitution in cannabis markets has been noticed in almost every developed country around the world, with a notable aversion for discrimination. Geographical, technological, cultural and economic factors help to explain why (indoor and outdoor) domestic cultivation is well established, and why the nature and extent of cultivation varies so dramatically across the western, developed nations. As we start the second decade of the 21st century, the new cannabis industry continues to fascinate both casual and academic observers of the drug scene. Researchers around the world have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon, aiming to describe, and potentially explain, the rapid switch from importation to domestic production in their own countries. In bringing together some of the world's leading experts on cannabis cultivation this book contains sixteen chapters that take an interdisciplinary look at global trends in cannabis cultivation. It will serve as an exemplar for wider discussions of key theories and concepts relating to the spread not just of cannabis cultivation, but also of illegal markets more generally, the actors that operate within these markets and the policies and practices that are employed in response to developments within these markets.",
editor = "Tom Decorte and Gary Potter and Martin Bouchard",
year = "2011",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781409417804",
publisher = "Ashgate",

}

RIS

TY - BOOK

T1 - World wide weed

T2 - global trends in cannabis cultivation and its control

A2 - Decorte, Tom

A2 - Potter, Gary

A2 - Bouchard, Martin

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - For the majority of its history, the cultivation of cannabis did not stand out, at least compared to the cultivation of other illegal plants. Cannabis plantations, like coca bush or opium poppy plantations, were typically large in size, grown by local farmers in a handful of developing (producing) countries, processed and then exported to industrial (consuming) nations. While cocaine and heroin are still produced in a handful of developing countries, cannabis cultivation is increasingly universal. From Europe to the Americas and Oceania, import substitution in cannabis markets has been noticed in almost every developed country around the world, with a notable aversion for discrimination. Geographical, technological, cultural and economic factors help to explain why (indoor and outdoor) domestic cultivation is well established, and why the nature and extent of cultivation varies so dramatically across the western, developed nations. As we start the second decade of the 21st century, the new cannabis industry continues to fascinate both casual and academic observers of the drug scene. Researchers around the world have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon, aiming to describe, and potentially explain, the rapid switch from importation to domestic production in their own countries. In bringing together some of the world's leading experts on cannabis cultivation this book contains sixteen chapters that take an interdisciplinary look at global trends in cannabis cultivation. It will serve as an exemplar for wider discussions of key theories and concepts relating to the spread not just of cannabis cultivation, but also of illegal markets more generally, the actors that operate within these markets and the policies and practices that are employed in response to developments within these markets.

AB - For the majority of its history, the cultivation of cannabis did not stand out, at least compared to the cultivation of other illegal plants. Cannabis plantations, like coca bush or opium poppy plantations, were typically large in size, grown by local farmers in a handful of developing (producing) countries, processed and then exported to industrial (consuming) nations. While cocaine and heroin are still produced in a handful of developing countries, cannabis cultivation is increasingly universal. From Europe to the Americas and Oceania, import substitution in cannabis markets has been noticed in almost every developed country around the world, with a notable aversion for discrimination. Geographical, technological, cultural and economic factors help to explain why (indoor and outdoor) domestic cultivation is well established, and why the nature and extent of cultivation varies so dramatically across the western, developed nations. As we start the second decade of the 21st century, the new cannabis industry continues to fascinate both casual and academic observers of the drug scene. Researchers around the world have become increasingly interested in the phenomenon, aiming to describe, and potentially explain, the rapid switch from importation to domestic production in their own countries. In bringing together some of the world's leading experts on cannabis cultivation this book contains sixteen chapters that take an interdisciplinary look at global trends in cannabis cultivation. It will serve as an exemplar for wider discussions of key theories and concepts relating to the spread not just of cannabis cultivation, but also of illegal markets more generally, the actors that operate within these markets and the policies and practices that are employed in response to developments within these markets.

M3 - Book

SN - 9781409417804

BT - World wide weed

PB - Ashgate

CY - Aldershot

ER -