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  • Blything et al 2015

    Rights statement: © 2015 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Young children’s comprehension of temporal relations in complex sentences: the influence of memory on performance

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/2015
<mark>Journal</mark>Child Development
Issue number6
Volume86
Number of pages13
Pages (from-to)1922-1934
Publication statusPublished
Early online date26/08/15
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The present study investigated 3- to 7-year-olds’ (N = 91) comprehension of two-clause sentences containing the temporal connectives before or after. The youngest children used an order of mention strategy to interpret the relation between clauses: They were more accurate when the presentation order matched the chronological order of events: “He ate his lunch, before he played in the garden” (chronological) versus “Before he played in the garden, he ate his lunch” (reverse). Between 4 and 6 years, performance was influenced by a combination of factors that influenced processing load: connective type and presentation order. An independent measure of working memory was predictive of performance. The study concludes that the memory demands of some sentence structures limits young children’s comprehension of sentences containing temporal connectives.

Bibliographic note

© 2015 The Authors. Child Development published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society for Research in Child Development. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.