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Young infants' visual fixation patterns in addition and subtraction tasks support an object tracking account

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Young infants' visual fixation patterns in addition and subtraction tasks support an object tracking account. / Bremner, James Gavin; Slater, Alan Michael; Hayes, Rachel; Mason, Ursula Charlotte; Murphy, Caroline; Spring, Joanne; Draper, Lucinda; Gaskell, David James; Johnson, Scott.

In: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, Vol. 162, 01.10.2017, p. 199-208.

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@article{58362365b46f4e8fb921f4882daecf3d,
title = "Young infants' visual fixation patterns in addition and subtraction tasks support an object tracking account",
abstract = "Investigating infants' numerical ability is crucial to identifying the developmental origins of numeracy. Wynn (1992) Nature, 358, 749-750, claimed that 5-month-old infants understand addition and subtraction as indicated by longer looking at outcomes that violate numerical operations (i.e., 1 + 1 = 1, or 2 – 1 = 2). However, her claim is contentious, with others suggesting that her results might reflect a familiarity preference for the initial array, or that they could be explained in terms of object tracking. To cast light on this controversy, Wynn{\textquoteright}s conditions were replicated with conventional looking time supplemented with eye tracker data. In the incorrect outcome of 2 in a subtraction event (2 – 1 = 2) infants looked selectively at the incorrectly present object, a finding that is not predicted by an initial array preference account or a symbolic numerical account, but which is consistent with a perceptual object tracking account. It appears that young infants can track at least one object over occlusion, and this may form the precursor of numerical ability.",
keywords = "Addition, Subtraction, Number, Object tracking, Object files, Infant perception",
author = "Bremner, {James Gavin} and Slater, {Alan Michael} and Rachel Hayes and Mason, {Ursula Charlotte} and Caroline Murphy and Joanne Spring and Lucinda Draper and Gaskell, {David James} and Scott Johnson",
year = "2017",
month = oct,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jecp.2017.05.007",
language = "English",
volume = "162",
pages = "199--208",
journal = "Journal of Experimental Child Psychology",
issn = "0022-0965",
publisher = "ELSEVIER ACADEMIC PRESS INC",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Young infants' visual fixation patterns in addition and subtraction tasks support an object tracking account

AU - Bremner, James Gavin

AU - Slater, Alan Michael

AU - Hayes, Rachel

AU - Mason, Ursula Charlotte

AU - Murphy, Caroline

AU - Spring, Joanne

AU - Draper, Lucinda

AU - Gaskell, David James

AU - Johnson, Scott

PY - 2017/10/1

Y1 - 2017/10/1

N2 - Investigating infants' numerical ability is crucial to identifying the developmental origins of numeracy. Wynn (1992) Nature, 358, 749-750, claimed that 5-month-old infants understand addition and subtraction as indicated by longer looking at outcomes that violate numerical operations (i.e., 1 + 1 = 1, or 2 – 1 = 2). However, her claim is contentious, with others suggesting that her results might reflect a familiarity preference for the initial array, or that they could be explained in terms of object tracking. To cast light on this controversy, Wynn’s conditions were replicated with conventional looking time supplemented with eye tracker data. In the incorrect outcome of 2 in a subtraction event (2 – 1 = 2) infants looked selectively at the incorrectly present object, a finding that is not predicted by an initial array preference account or a symbolic numerical account, but which is consistent with a perceptual object tracking account. It appears that young infants can track at least one object over occlusion, and this may form the precursor of numerical ability.

AB - Investigating infants' numerical ability is crucial to identifying the developmental origins of numeracy. Wynn (1992) Nature, 358, 749-750, claimed that 5-month-old infants understand addition and subtraction as indicated by longer looking at outcomes that violate numerical operations (i.e., 1 + 1 = 1, or 2 – 1 = 2). However, her claim is contentious, with others suggesting that her results might reflect a familiarity preference for the initial array, or that they could be explained in terms of object tracking. To cast light on this controversy, Wynn’s conditions were replicated with conventional looking time supplemented with eye tracker data. In the incorrect outcome of 2 in a subtraction event (2 – 1 = 2) infants looked selectively at the incorrectly present object, a finding that is not predicted by an initial array preference account or a symbolic numerical account, but which is consistent with a perceptual object tracking account. It appears that young infants can track at least one object over occlusion, and this may form the precursor of numerical ability.

KW - Addition

KW - Subtraction

KW - Number

KW - Object tracking

KW - Object files

KW - Infant perception

U2 - 10.1016/j.jecp.2017.05.007

DO - 10.1016/j.jecp.2017.05.007

M3 - Journal article

VL - 162

SP - 199

EP - 208

JO - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

JF - Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

SN - 0022-0965

ER -