Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐...

Electronic data

  • Main document reviewed_final

    Rights statement: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Malda‐Castillo, J. , Browne, C. and Perez‐Algorta, G. (2019), Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: A systematic literature review. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practive doi: 10.1111/papt.12195 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/papt.12195 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

    Accepted author manuscript, 2.02 MB, Word document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: a systematic literature review

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Published

Standard

Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status : a systematic literature review. / Malda Castillo, Javier; Browne, Claire ; Perez Algorta, Guillermo Daniel.

In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, Vol. 92, No. 4, 01.12.2019, p. 465-498.

Research output: Contribution to Journal/MagazineJournal articlepeer-review

Harvard

Malda Castillo, J, Browne, C & Perez Algorta, GD 2019, 'Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: a systematic literature review', Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, vol. 92, no. 4, pp. 465-498. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12195

APA

Malda Castillo, J., Browne, C., & Perez Algorta, G. D. (2019). Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: a systematic literature review. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice, 92(4), 465-498. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12195

Vancouver

Malda Castillo J, Browne C, Perez Algorta GD. Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: a systematic literature review. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice. 2019 Dec 1;92(4):465-498. https://doi.org/10.1111/papt.12195

Author

Malda Castillo, Javier ; Browne, Claire ; Perez Algorta, Guillermo Daniel. / Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status : a systematic literature review. In: Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice. 2019 ; Vol. 92, No. 4. pp. 465-498.

Bibtex

@article{c0faa0ddd44a4576beb697589afd8420,
title = "Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: a systematic literature review",
abstract = "Purpose: This study reviewed the evidence base status of Mentalisation Based Treatment (MBT), its quality, strengths and limitations. The aim was to pave the way for further MBT research. Method: An electronic database and reference lists search identified MBT outcome papers and these were systematically reviewed. The quality of the studies and the risk of bias were determined using two validated checklist tools. Results: Twenty-three studies were included in the review. This included nine randomised controlled trials, seven uncontrolled pre-post effectiveness studies, three retrospective cohort studies, two uncontrolled randomised trials and two case studies. The methodological quality of almost half of the papers was assessed as fair (43%), followed by good (34%) poor (17%) and excellent (4%) ratings. Nevertheless, the review identified risk of confounding bias across the majority of studies (60%) and fidelity to treatment was poorly reported in almost half of the studies (47%). Most of the studies focused on Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), showing positive clinical outcomes for this population but the evidence base for other presentations was still developing. The treatment of adolescents who self-harm and at-risk mothers in substance abuse treatment showed particularly promising results, as these are client groups that have previously shown limited positive response to psychological interventions. Conclusions: MBT is a potentially effective method across a wide range of clinical presentations but further research should focus on increasing the quality and the quantity of the MBT evidence outside the treatment of BPD.",
author = "{Malda Castillo}, Javier and Claire Browne and {Perez Algorta}, {Guillermo Daniel}",
note = "This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Malda‐Castillo, J. , Browne, C. and Perez‐Algorta, G. (2019), Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: A systematic literature review. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practive doi: 10.1111/papt.12195 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/papt.12195 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.",
year = "2019",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/papt.12195",
language = "English",
volume = "92",
pages = "465--498",
journal = "Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice",
issn = "1476-0835",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status

T2 - a systematic literature review

AU - Malda Castillo, Javier

AU - Browne, Claire

AU - Perez Algorta, Guillermo Daniel

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Malda‐Castillo, J. , Browne, C. and Perez‐Algorta, G. (2019), Mentalization‐based treatment and its evidence‐base status: A systematic literature review. Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practive doi: 10.1111/papt.12195 which has been published in final form at https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/papt.12195 This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance With Wiley Terms and Conditions for self-archiving.

PY - 2019/12/1

Y1 - 2019/12/1

N2 - Purpose: This study reviewed the evidence base status of Mentalisation Based Treatment (MBT), its quality, strengths and limitations. The aim was to pave the way for further MBT research. Method: An electronic database and reference lists search identified MBT outcome papers and these were systematically reviewed. The quality of the studies and the risk of bias were determined using two validated checklist tools. Results: Twenty-three studies were included in the review. This included nine randomised controlled trials, seven uncontrolled pre-post effectiveness studies, three retrospective cohort studies, two uncontrolled randomised trials and two case studies. The methodological quality of almost half of the papers was assessed as fair (43%), followed by good (34%) poor (17%) and excellent (4%) ratings. Nevertheless, the review identified risk of confounding bias across the majority of studies (60%) and fidelity to treatment was poorly reported in almost half of the studies (47%). Most of the studies focused on Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), showing positive clinical outcomes for this population but the evidence base for other presentations was still developing. The treatment of adolescents who self-harm and at-risk mothers in substance abuse treatment showed particularly promising results, as these are client groups that have previously shown limited positive response to psychological interventions. Conclusions: MBT is a potentially effective method across a wide range of clinical presentations but further research should focus on increasing the quality and the quantity of the MBT evidence outside the treatment of BPD.

AB - Purpose: This study reviewed the evidence base status of Mentalisation Based Treatment (MBT), its quality, strengths and limitations. The aim was to pave the way for further MBT research. Method: An electronic database and reference lists search identified MBT outcome papers and these were systematically reviewed. The quality of the studies and the risk of bias were determined using two validated checklist tools. Results: Twenty-three studies were included in the review. This included nine randomised controlled trials, seven uncontrolled pre-post effectiveness studies, three retrospective cohort studies, two uncontrolled randomised trials and two case studies. The methodological quality of almost half of the papers was assessed as fair (43%), followed by good (34%) poor (17%) and excellent (4%) ratings. Nevertheless, the review identified risk of confounding bias across the majority of studies (60%) and fidelity to treatment was poorly reported in almost half of the studies (47%). Most of the studies focused on Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD), showing positive clinical outcomes for this population but the evidence base for other presentations was still developing. The treatment of adolescents who self-harm and at-risk mothers in substance abuse treatment showed particularly promising results, as these are client groups that have previously shown limited positive response to psychological interventions. Conclusions: MBT is a potentially effective method across a wide range of clinical presentations but further research should focus on increasing the quality and the quantity of the MBT evidence outside the treatment of BPD.

U2 - 10.1111/papt.12195

DO - 10.1111/papt.12195

M3 - Journal article

VL - 92

SP - 465

EP - 498

JO - Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice

JF - Psychology and Psychotherapy: Theory, Research and Practice

SN - 1476-0835

IS - 4

ER -