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Steven Jones supervises 33 postgraduate research students. If these students have produced research profiles, these are listed below:

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Professor Steven Jones

Professor

Steven Jones

Lancaster University

Furness Building

LA14YX

Lancaster

Tel: +44 1524 593382

Research overview

The focus of my research is the psychology and psychological treatment of severe mental health problems with a particular focus on bipolar disorder and related conditions. In conducting this research I work extensively with individuals with lived experience of mental health issues to ensure that the research focusses on areas of importance to service users. Work to date has led to the development of a series new interventions to help people living with bipolar ranging from web-based self management support to intensive face-to-face psychological therapy to enhance personal recovery.

PhD Supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students on:

  1. Topics linked to the psychology of bipolar and related conditions across the lifespan, particularly those exploring personal recovery and flourishing. 
  2. Topics linked to behavioural and familial risk for bipolar and related conditions, particularly those exploring appraisal, positive emotion and high functioning.

I am happy to work with promising students on developing studentship applications for external funding, as well as supporting fellowship applications.

PhD supervision

I am interested in supervising PhD students on: 1. Topics linked to the psychology of bipolar and related conditions across the lifespan, particularly those exploring personal recovery and flourishing. 2. Topics linked to behavioural and familial risk for bipolar and related conditions, particularly those exploring appraisal, positive emotion and high functioning. I am happy to work with promising students on developing studentship applications for external funding, as well as supporting fellowship applications.

Current Research

  1. Tyler, E., Jones S. & Lobban F. (2015). A pilot study to test the feasibility and acceptability of delivering recovery focused cognitive-behavioural therapy to older adults with bipolar disorder. NIHR Fellowship
  2.  Lobban, F., Jones, S. & Sawyer, P. (2014 – 2017). Spectrum Mobile Technology in Mental Health Fellowship. Funded by the Mary Kinross Charity.
  3. Lobban, F.,  Jones, S., Johnson, S., Minns, V, Pinfold, V., Siddle, R., Hollingsworth, B., Smith, J. (2016-2019). Implementation of an online supported self-management intervention for relatives of people with recent onset psychosis: the Relatives’ Education and Coping Tollkit “REACT”. NIHR Health Services and Delivery Research.
  4. Lobban, F., Jones S., Johnson, S., Minns, V., Williamson, P., Murray, E. (2016-2019). An online randomised controlled trial to evaluate the clinical and cost effectiveness of a peer supported self-management intervention for relatives of people with psychosis or bipolar disorder: Relatives Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT). NIHR Health Technology Assessment.
  5. Murray,G., Michalak, E., Kyrios, M., Johnson, S., Jones, S. & Thomas, N.(2016-2021). Improving quality of life in late stage bipolar disorder: RCT of a novel psychological treatment. National Health and Medical Research Council Australia.
  6. Gooding, P., Haddock, G., Pratt,D., Drake, R., Jones, S., Lobban, F., Kapur, N., Peters, S., Emsley, R., Marriott, A. (2017-2021) A psychological intervention for suicide applied to patents with psychosis: the CARMS trial (cognitive approaches to remedying suicide). NIHR Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation.
  7. Wright, K., Dodd, A., Medina-Lara, A., Warren, F., Lynch, T., Dunn, D, Jones, S., Taylor, R., Pragnell, L. (2017-2020). The clinical and cost effectiveness of adapted Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) for Bipolar Mood Instability in primary care (ThriVe-B programme): A feasibility study. NIHR Research for Patient Benefit.
  8. Duffy, A., Bentall, R.P., Geddes, J., Goodday, S., Grof, P. Jones, S. Keown-Stoneman, C., Milve, R., Saunders, K. Wong, A., Horrocks, J. Petronis, A. (2017-2022). Predicting the onset of bipolar disorder:  A longitudinal high-risk study. Canadian Institute for Health Research.
  9. Jones, S. H. (2018). Online digital support for bipolar disorder. HSE Ireland, via Silvercloud Health.
  10. Jones, S.H., Lobban, F. & Cooke, A. (2020). Understanding bipolar disorder – Update. British Psychological Society. 
  11. Lobban, F., Jones, S., Fisher, N., Marshall, M. (2018) Implementation of the Relatives’ Education And Coping Toolkit (REACT). 
  12. Jones, S. et al (2020). Engage network development for adolescent mental health. Lancaster University.
  13. Jones S. et al. (2020). Coproducing evidence based mental health support for bipolar in Africa. Lancaster University.

Research Interests

Bipolar disorder affects about 1 million people in the UK. It is characterised by periods of elevated mood (mania) and low mood (depression).  In between these periods people with this diagnosis often continue to experience significant levels of mood problems which can interfere with their relationships, quality of life and work. Traditionally bipolar disorder has been treated with medication as the front line therapy. However, there is clear evidence that many individuals do not take their medication as prescribed and even amongst those who do clinical benefits can be limited.  This has led to increasing calls for the development of effective psychological therapies.  The Spectrum Centre has developed and evaluated a series of such novel interventions including group psychoeducation, and integrated psychological therapy for anxiety and substance use issues. A particular focus has been on understanding, measuring and promoting personal recovery in bipolar in response to service user priorties. As such we have developed and evaluated the bipolar recovery questionnaire as a sensitive measure of personal recovery and recovery focused therapy as an intervention with improves personal recovery outcomes.

To improve access we have conducted web based studies exploring the benefits of psychoeducation, relapse prevention and parenting support for bipolar parents. In addition we have evaluated the benefits of providing support to relatives of people with psychosis and bipolar including understanding how this might best be implemented in the NHS.

In addition to intervention studies we also conduct work on the psychological processes associated with bipolar disorder including try understand more about both the positive and negative experiences that people living with bipolar disorder report. Recent work has highlighted how people's explanations of their experiences influencetheir personal recovery and experiences of inspiration. We are also examining sociodemographic factors impacting on high functioning in bipolar and how people describe their bipolar experience, partciularly personal recovery, through social media.

Our work has been supported by a range of funders including, NIHR programme grants, NIHR RfPB grants, MRC, ESRC, Cripps Trust and NHS Trusts.

Current Teaching

PG Programmes - I currently contribute to:

  1. PhD in Mental Health

    • DHR.407 Adult mental health: Theory, research and practice
    • DHR 405 Summer and Autumn Academy
    • DHR 516 Theory and Methods: Choices for Health Research
    • DHR 403 Principles of Research Design and Practical Research Ethics

    MSc Programmes in Dept of Psychology

    • DHR.407a Adult mental health: Theory, research and practice

     

Additional Information

I am a Professor of Clinical Psychology and Co-Director of  the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research which sits within the Division of Health Research in the Faculty of Health and Medicine. I am Chair of the Divisional Research Committee, member of the Faculty Research Committee and member of the Division of Health Research Executive Committee.  I have contributed to the REF process primarily through providing one of the Faculty REF impact cases with my colleague Dr Lobban. I continue to have strong links with the NHS at national and local level including co-leading the only demonstration site for bipolar disorder treatment selected by the Improving Access to Psychological Therapies programme.  I am also a member of the Guideline Development Group for bipolar disorder for the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence. I have active research collaborations with the University and with national and international colleagues (mainly US and Canada).

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