Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > China's 'new type of Great Power relations'

Electronic data

  • 2015_11_20_zeng_and_breslin_great_power_final_revised_for_submission_to_ia_3_ (1)

    Rights statement: This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in International Affairs following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version JINGHAN ZENG, SHAUN BRESLIN; China's ‘new type of Great Power relations’: a G2 with Chinese characteristics?, International Affairs, Volume 92, Issue 4, 1 July 2016, Pages 773–794, https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2346.12656 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/ia/article/92/4/773/2688082

    Accepted author manuscript, 660 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

China's 'new type of Great Power relations': a G2 with Chinese characteristics?

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>07/2016
<mark>Journal</mark>International Affairs
Issue number4
Volume92
Number of pages23
Pages (from-to)773-794
Publication statusPublished
Early online date20/06/16
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

The rise of China has been reshaping how the country sees its own role in the world. China has become increasingly willing to move from being a norm and system taker to a norm and system shaper (if not yet maker). One example is Xi Jinping's promotion of 'a new type of Great Power relations' designed to create a strategic space in which to operate. By using a mixed quantitative/qualitative analysis, we analyse 141 Chinese articles titled with 'new type of Great Power relations'. We find that although Chinese analysts and policy makers rejected the idea of a G2 in 2009, the mainstream discourse has rapidly shifted to what we call a 'G2 with Chinese characteristics' which indicates a fundamental shift in Chinese evaluation of the power status of itself and others. While some Chinese scholars consider China to have already achieved the status as the world's No. 2 or even a superpower, the mainstream discourse views China as both a Great Power and a rising power at the same time. This, we argue, moderates the expectations of what China can and should do to resolve global problems despite its great power status.

Bibliographic note

This is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in International Affairs following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version JINGHAN ZENG, SHAUN BRESLIN; China's ‘new type of Great Power relations’: a G2 with Chinese characteristics?, International Affairs, Volume 92, Issue 4, 1 July 2016, Pages 773–794, https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-2346.12656 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/ia/article/92/4/773/2688082