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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Cleaner Production. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Cleaner Production, 181, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.12.130

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A Systematic Review of the Literature on Integrating Sustainability into Engineering Curricula

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>20/04/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Cleaner Production
Volume181
Number of pages10
Pages (from-to)608-617
Publication statusPublished
Early online date28/12/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Higher education plays an important role in furthering the sustainability agenda, as reflected in a growing body of literature. While there have been several recent reviews of this work, these have been limited in scope and do not explicitly discuss implementations of sustainability in higher education curricula. In response, this paper presents a comprehensive, systematic review of the literature on integrating sustainability into curricula at both an undergraduate and postgraduate level of study in one particular subject area – engineering. A total of 247 articles, of which 70 were case reports, have been analyzed. Twelve future research questions emerged from the analysis, including: the exploration of the knowledge and value frameworks of students and teachers; the exploration of stakeholder influence, including by accreditation institutions, industry partners, parents, and society; and, the use of competencies to evaluate implementations. It is hoped that answering these questions will help to enhance education such that engineers are prepared, engaged, and empowered to confront the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the 21st century.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Cleaner Production. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Cleaner Production, 181, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.jclepro.2017.12.130