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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Studies on Security on 02/05/2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587

    Accepted author manuscript, 231 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 2/11/21

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Algorithmic Warfare and the Reinvention of Accuracy

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Algorithmic Warfare and the Reinvention of Accuracy. / Suchman, Lucy.

In: Critical Studies on Security, Vol. 8, No. 2, 01.12.2020, p. 175-187.

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Suchman, Lucy. / Algorithmic Warfare and the Reinvention of Accuracy. In: Critical Studies on Security. 2020 ; Vol. 8, No. 2. pp. 175-187.

Bibtex

@article{27f743cb584e4defa2f1514a1cf8edc3,
title = "Algorithmic Warfare and the Reinvention of Accuracy",
abstract = "This article aims to integrate two interrelated strands in critical security studies. The first is mounting evidence for the fallacy of claims for precision and accuracy in the United States {\textquoteleft}counterterrorism{\textquoteright} programme, particularly as it involves expanding aerial surveillance in support of operations of extrajudicial assassination. The second line of critical analysis concerns growing investment in the further automation of these operations, more specifically in the form of the US Department of Defense Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, or Project Maven. Building upon generative intersections of critical security studies and science and technology studies (STS), I argue that the promotion of automated data analysis under the sign of artificial intelligence can only serve to exacerbate military operations that are at once discriminatory and indiscriminate in their targeting, while remaining politically and legally unaccountable.",
keywords = "mlitary, targeting, artificial intelligence, weapons",
author = "Lucy Suchman",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Studies on Security on 02/05/2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587",
year = "2020",
month = dec,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587",
language = "English",
volume = "8",
pages = "175--187",
journal = "Critical Studies on Security",
issn = "2162-4887",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Algorithmic Warfare and the Reinvention of Accuracy

AU - Suchman, Lucy

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Studies on Security on 02/05/2020 available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587

PY - 2020/12/1

Y1 - 2020/12/1

N2 - This article aims to integrate two interrelated strands in critical security studies. The first is mounting evidence for the fallacy of claims for precision and accuracy in the United States ‘counterterrorism’ programme, particularly as it involves expanding aerial surveillance in support of operations of extrajudicial assassination. The second line of critical analysis concerns growing investment in the further automation of these operations, more specifically in the form of the US Department of Defense Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, or Project Maven. Building upon generative intersections of critical security studies and science and technology studies (STS), I argue that the promotion of automated data analysis under the sign of artificial intelligence can only serve to exacerbate military operations that are at once discriminatory and indiscriminate in their targeting, while remaining politically and legally unaccountable.

AB - This article aims to integrate two interrelated strands in critical security studies. The first is mounting evidence for the fallacy of claims for precision and accuracy in the United States ‘counterterrorism’ programme, particularly as it involves expanding aerial surveillance in support of operations of extrajudicial assassination. The second line of critical analysis concerns growing investment in the further automation of these operations, more specifically in the form of the US Department of Defense Algorithmic Warfare Cross-Functional Team, or Project Maven. Building upon generative intersections of critical security studies and science and technology studies (STS), I argue that the promotion of automated data analysis under the sign of artificial intelligence can only serve to exacerbate military operations that are at once discriminatory and indiscriminate in their targeting, while remaining politically and legally unaccountable.

KW - mlitary

KW - targeting

KW - artificial intelligence

KW - weapons

U2 - 10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587

DO - 10.1080/21624887.2020.1760587

M3 - Journal article

VL - 8

SP - 175

EP - 187

JO - Critical Studies on Security

JF - Critical Studies on Security

SN - 2162-4887

IS - 2

ER -