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  • REVISED_Online_action_and_future_collective_action_Main_Document_CHB

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Computers in Human Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Computers in Human Behavior, 91, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.09.007

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All click, no action?: Online action, efficacy perceptions, and prior experience combine to affect future collective action

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>1/02/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Computers in Human Behavior
Volume91
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)97-105
Publication statusPublished
Early online date14/09/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Social media is increasingly used for social protest, but does internet-enabled action lead to ‘slacktivism’ or promote increased activism? We show that the answer to this question depends on prior level of activism, and on beliefs about the effectiveness of individual contribution to the collective campaign. Internet-enabled action was varied quasi-experimentally, with participants (n = 143) choosing whether or not to share a campaign on social media. Participants were then informed that sharing on social media had a big (high action efficacy) or small (low action efficacy) impact on achieving the campaign's goal. Prior levels of activism were measured before the experiment, and general levels of collective action were measured one week after the experiment. Taking internet-enabled action for one campaign increased future activism for other campaigns – but only in individuals who were already active and who perceived their actions to be an effective contribution to the campaign.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Computers in Human Behavior. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Computers in Human Behavior, 91, 2019 DOI: 10.1016/j.chb.2018.09.007