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    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Transnational Screens on 08/04/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/25785273.2019.1602325

    Accepted author manuscript, 444 KB, PDF-document

    Embargo ends: 8/10/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Close Encounters with Foreignness

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>8/04/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Transnational Screens (Formerly Transnational Cinemas (2010-2018))
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date8/04/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This article opens with reflections upon the authors’ formative encounters with world cinema in Poland and the UK, and the importance of television in providing access to a wide variety of ‘foreign’ films. We propose that the process of viewing transnational films exemplifies this encounter with foreignness and that the value of studying transnational films is that their thematic focus upon encounters invites us to reflect upon questions of translation and misrecognition, difference and sameness. Through a close analysis of Cold War (Pawlikowski, 2017), the article discusses the way in which this film explores questions of cultural politics and national identity, migrant experience and exile, and the transnational circulation of texts. We argue that the film, which follows the experiences of a couple who move back and forth across the ‘iron curtain’ in post-WW2 Europe, offers a critique of nationalist ideologies and invites us to recognise ‘foreignness’ as a constitutive component of local and national cultures. Cold War, we suggest, is an exemplary transnational film in so far as it prompts us to recognise how even familiar cultures are repeatedly transected by difference.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Transnational Screens on 08/04/2019, available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/25785273.2019.1602325