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Cognitive optimism of distinctive initiatives to foster self-directed and self-regulated learning skills: A comparative analysis of conventional and blended-learning in undergraduate studies

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Cognitive optimism of distinctive initiatives to foster self-directed and self-regulated learning skills : A comparative analysis of conventional and blended-learning in undergraduate studies. / Onah, Daniel F. O.; Pang, Elaine Ling Ling ; Sinclair, Jane Elizabeth.

In: Education and Information Technologies, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.09.2020, p. 4365–4380.

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Onah, Daniel F. O. ; Pang, Elaine Ling Ling ; Sinclair, Jane Elizabeth. / Cognitive optimism of distinctive initiatives to foster self-directed and self-regulated learning skills : A comparative analysis of conventional and blended-learning in undergraduate studies. In: Education and Information Technologies. 2020 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 4365–4380.

Bibtex

@article{f7a58158edf24b68b5c812186b7441d3,
title = "Cognitive optimism of distinctive initiatives to foster self-directed and self-regulated learning skills: A comparative analysis of conventional and blended-learning in undergraduate studies",
abstract = "Independent learning in massive open online courses (MOOCs) requires considerable effort from the learners themselves. Blended-learning has been recognised to foster independent learning among undergraduate students. With the popularity of the blended-learning approach to teach in traditional educational settings, little has been mentioned on how cohesive this approach is in fostering self-directed learning and self-regulation among university students. This study hopes to explore undergraduate learners in their distinctive study patterns. The study was conducted to investigate a comparative study between students from two departments; Science and Social Science. The aim was to explore the students{\textquoteright} self-directed and self-regulated learning skills in conventional classrooms and aspects of blended-learning embedded in a MOOC platform in two academic years for undergraduates at a top UK university. This study encompasses two case studies; firstly, a combine blended-learning seminar and a conventional seminar classes and a study undertaken with a student of English as a second language (ESL). The blended-learning students were participants who registered in a conventional university and took an optional module in computer security.The second group of students participated in a core module of logic andverification. The second case study was with a final year undergraduate studentin Education Studies. The students studied and engaged with the course contentusing their initiative and directing their learning approaches.",
keywords = "Cognitive initiative, Independent learning, Self-regulated learning, MOOC, Conventional learning, Blended-learning, Motivation, Strategies of self-regulation",
author = "Onah, {Daniel F. O.} and Pang, {Elaine Ling Ling} and Sinclair, {Jane Elizabeth}",
year = "2020",
month = sep
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10639-020-10172-w",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "4365–4380",
journal = "Education and Information Technologies",
issn = "1360-2357",
publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cognitive optimism of distinctive initiatives to foster self-directed and self-regulated learning skills

T2 - A comparative analysis of conventional and blended-learning in undergraduate studies

AU - Onah, Daniel F. O.

AU - Pang, Elaine Ling Ling

AU - Sinclair, Jane Elizabeth

PY - 2020/9/1

Y1 - 2020/9/1

N2 - Independent learning in massive open online courses (MOOCs) requires considerable effort from the learners themselves. Blended-learning has been recognised to foster independent learning among undergraduate students. With the popularity of the blended-learning approach to teach in traditional educational settings, little has been mentioned on how cohesive this approach is in fostering self-directed learning and self-regulation among university students. This study hopes to explore undergraduate learners in their distinctive study patterns. The study was conducted to investigate a comparative study between students from two departments; Science and Social Science. The aim was to explore the students’ self-directed and self-regulated learning skills in conventional classrooms and aspects of blended-learning embedded in a MOOC platform in two academic years for undergraduates at a top UK university. This study encompasses two case studies; firstly, a combine blended-learning seminar and a conventional seminar classes and a study undertaken with a student of English as a second language (ESL). The blended-learning students were participants who registered in a conventional university and took an optional module in computer security.The second group of students participated in a core module of logic andverification. The second case study was with a final year undergraduate studentin Education Studies. The students studied and engaged with the course contentusing their initiative and directing their learning approaches.

AB - Independent learning in massive open online courses (MOOCs) requires considerable effort from the learners themselves. Blended-learning has been recognised to foster independent learning among undergraduate students. With the popularity of the blended-learning approach to teach in traditional educational settings, little has been mentioned on how cohesive this approach is in fostering self-directed learning and self-regulation among university students. This study hopes to explore undergraduate learners in their distinctive study patterns. The study was conducted to investigate a comparative study between students from two departments; Science and Social Science. The aim was to explore the students’ self-directed and self-regulated learning skills in conventional classrooms and aspects of blended-learning embedded in a MOOC platform in two academic years for undergraduates at a top UK university. This study encompasses two case studies; firstly, a combine blended-learning seminar and a conventional seminar classes and a study undertaken with a student of English as a second language (ESL). The blended-learning students were participants who registered in a conventional university and took an optional module in computer security.The second group of students participated in a core module of logic andverification. The second case study was with a final year undergraduate studentin Education Studies. The students studied and engaged with the course contentusing their initiative and directing their learning approaches.

KW - Cognitive initiative

KW - Independent learning

KW - Self-regulated learning

KW - MOOC

KW - Conventional learning

KW - Blended-learning

KW - Motivation

KW - Strategies of self-regulation

U2 - 10.1007/s10639-020-10172-w

DO - 10.1007/s10639-020-10172-w

M3 - Journal article

VL - 25

SP - 4365

EP - 4380

JO - Education and Information Technologies

JF - Education and Information Technologies

SN - 1360-2357

IS - 5

ER -