Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Diagnose Pathogens in Drinking Water via Magnet...

Electronic data

  • MATPR_Functional Materials_SERS Pathogen_Zhang

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Materials Today Proceedings. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Materials Today Proceedings, 4, 1, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.matpr.2017.01.189

    Accepted author manuscript, 504 KB, PDF document

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

Links

Text available via DOI:

View graph of relations

Diagnose Pathogens in Drinking Water via Magnetic Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Assay

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>19/03/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Materials Today: Proceedings
Issue number1
Volume4
Number of pages7
Pages (from-to)25-31
Publication statusPublished
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Abstract Rapid identification and diagnosis of bacteria and other microorganisms is a great challenge for drinking water safety due to the increasing frequency of pathogenic infections. Raman spectroscopy is a non-destructive tool to characterize the biochemical fingerprints of bacterial cells and its signal can be improved by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Thus, Raman scattering has a huge potential in fast diagnosis of pathogens in drinking water, with low cost and high reproducibility. In this work, we developed a novel fast diagnosis method to detect aquatic pathogens via magnetic SERS assay. With chemical co-precipitation synthesis and surface glucose reduction, the silver-coated magnetic nanoparticles (Ag@MNPs) had a well-developed core-shell structure and high efficiency to capture bacterial cells. Ag@MNPs achieved 103 enhancement factor for rhodamine 6G and the limit of detection was 10-9 M. The magnetic SERS assay also successfully detected various bacteria (A. baylyi and E. coli) with high sensitivity (105 CFU/mL). This platform provided a promising and easy-operation approach for pathogen detection for food and drinking water safety.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Materials Today Proceedings. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Materials Today Proceedings, 4, 1, 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.matpr.2017.01.189