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    Rights statement: © ACM, 2015. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in NS Ethics '15 Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2793013.2793018

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Does the internet deserve everybody?

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Publication date08/2015
Host publicationNS Ethics '15 Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherACM
Pages5-8
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781450335416
Original languageEnglish
EventACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research - Imperial College, London, United Kingdom
Duration: 17/08/201521/08/2015

Workshop

WorkshopACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period17/08/1521/08/15

Workshop

WorkshopACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period17/08/1521/08/15

Abstract

There has been a long standing tradition amongst developed nations of influencing, both directly and indirectly, the activities of developing economies. Behind this is one of a range of aims: building/improving living standards, bettering the social status of recipient communities, etc. In some cases, this has resulted in prosperous relations, yet often this has been seen as the exploitation of a power position or a veneer for other activities (e.g. to tap into new emerging markets). In this paper, we explore whether initiatives to improve Internet connectivity in developing regions are always ethical. We draw a list of issues that would aid in formulating Internet initiatives that are ethical, effective, and sustainable.

Bibliographic note

© ACM, 2015. This is the author's version of the work. It is posted here for your personal use. Not for redistribution. The definitive Version of Record was published in NS Ethics '15 Proceedings of the 2015 ACM SIGCOMM Workshop on Ethics in Networked Systems Research http://dx.doi.org/10.1145/2793013.2793018