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    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Burns. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Burns, 43,(4), 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2016.11.015

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Dressing changes in a burns unit for children under the age of five: a qualitative study of mothers’ experiences

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>06/2017
<mark>Journal</mark>Burns
Issue number4
Volume43
Number of pages9
Pages (from-to)757-765
Publication statusPublished
Early online date6/01/17
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate the experiences of mothers who had attended their child’s burn dressing changes. Participants were recruited from a burns unit based within a children’s hospital. Face-to-face interviews were conducted with five mothers of children under the age of five who had undergone a series of dressing changes taking place on the burns unit. The interview guide explored parents’ experience of initial and subsequent dressing changes. Participants were prompted to explore their expectations, thoughts, feelings and behaviours associated with these experiences. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. The analysis identified four themes: ‘needing to fulfil the responsibilities associated with being a mother’; ‘emotional synchrony between mother and child’; ‘being informed and knowing what to expect’; and ‘the importance of establishing rapport with nurses performing dressing changes’. Findings from this research can inform services to help optimise mothers’ experiences of dressing changes in this stage of pediatric burn care.

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Burns. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Burns, 43,(4), 2017 DOI: 10.1016/j.burns.2016.11.015