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  • 1-s2.0-S1773224718306208-main

    Rights statement: This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology, ??, ?, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.ddst.2018.07.002

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    Embargo ends: 3/07/19

    Available under license: CC BY-NC-ND: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License

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Dual stimuli-responsive polypyrrole nanoparticles for anticancer therapy

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>3/07/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology
<mark>State</mark>E-pub ahead of print
Early online date3/07/18
<mark>Original language</mark>English

Abstract

We report the development of dual stimuli-responsive nanoparticles with potential for anticancer therapy. The nanoparticles are composed of a conjugated polymer (polypyrrole, PPY) loaded with an anticancer drug (allicin), and were characterized by a variety of physicochemical techniques. The dual stimuli-responsive nature of the PPY nanoparticles was validated in vitro: the PPY nanoparticles delivered an anticancer drug (allicin) in response to exposure to an electric field in vitro as demonstrated with UV–vis spectroscopy; and the PPY nanoparticles exhibited photothermal activity upon irradiation with near infrared light which resulted in resulted in toxicity towards HEP G2 cells in vitro. We believe that such nanoparticles have long term potential for application in cancer therapy in a variety of tissue niches (e.g. breast cancer, liver cancer, lung cancer, skin cancer).

Bibliographic note

This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Journal of Drug Delivery Science and Technology, ??, ?, 2018 DOI: 10.1016/j.ddst.2018.07.002