12,000

We have over 12,000 students, from over 100 countries, within one of the safest campuses in the UK

93%

93% of Lancaster students go into work or further study within six months of graduating

Home > Research > Publications & Outputs > Effect of shear connector spacing and layout on...
View graph of relations

« Back

Effect of shear connector spacing and layout on the shear connector capacity in composite beams

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

Published

Journal publication date04/2011
JournalJournal of constructional steel research
Journal number4
Volume67
Number of pages14
Pages706-719
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

A three dimensional nonlinear finite element model has been developed to study the behaviour of composite beams with profiled sheeting oriented perpendicular to its axis. The analysis of the push test was carried out using ABAQUS/Explicit with slow load application to ensure a quasi-static solution. Both material and geometric nonlinearities were taken into account. Elastic-plastic material models were used for all steel components and the Concrete Damaged Plasticity model was used for the concrete slab. The post-failure behaviour of the push test was accurately predicted, which is crucial for realistic determination of shear capacity, slip and failure mode. The results obtained from finite element analysis were verified against the experimental push tests conducted in this research and also from other studies. After validation, the model was used to carry out an extensive parametric study to investigate the effect of transverse spacing in push tests with double studs placed in favourable and staggered positions with various concrete strengths. The results were also compared with the capacity of a single shear stud. It was found that shear connector resistance of pairs of shear connectors placed in favourable position was 94% of the strength of a single shear stud on average, when the transverse spacing between studs was 200 mm or more. For the same spacing, the resistance of staggered pairs of studs was only 86% of the strength of a single stud. The strength of double shear studs in favourable position was higher than that of the staggered pairs of shear connectors.