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    Rights statement: This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b11546

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Electrically Conductive Polydopamine–Polypyrrole as High Performance Biomaterials for Cell Stimulation in Vitro and Electrical Signal Recording in Vivo

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<mark>Journal publication date</mark>3/10/2018
<mark>Journal</mark>ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Issue number39
Volume10
Number of pages11
Pages (from-to)33032-33042
Publication statusPublished
Early online date7/09/18
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Conductive polymers (CPs) such as polypyrrole (PPY) are emerging biomaterials for use as scaffolds and bioelectrodes which interact with biological systems electrically. Still, more electrically conductive and biologically interactive CPs are required to develop high performance biomaterials and medical devices. In this study, in situ electrochemical copolymerization of polydopamine (PDA) and PPY were performed for electrode modification. Their material and biological properties were characterized using multiple techniques. The electrical properties of electrodes coated with PDA/PPY were superior to electrodes coated with PPY alone. The growth and differentiation of C2C12 myoblasts and PC12 neuronal cells on PDA/PPY was enhanced compared to PPY. Electrical stimulation of PC12 cells on PDA/PPY further promoted neuritogenesis. In vivo electromyography signal measurements demonstrated more sensitive signals from tibia muscles when using PDA/PPY-coated electrodes than bare or PPY-coated electrodes, revealing PDA/PPY to be a high-performance biomaterial with potential for various biomedical applications.

Bibliographic note

This document is the Accepted Manuscript version of a Published Work that appeared in final form in ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces, copyright © 2018 American Chemical Society after peer review and technical editing by the publisher. To access the final edited and published work see https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsami.8b11546