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  • CPH_Hennell_et_al_Go_hard_or_go_home_final_PURE_version (1)

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Public Health on 11/11/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09581596.2019.1686460

    Accepted author manuscript, 266 KB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 11/11/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Go hard or go home: a social practice theory approach to young people’s ‘risky’ alcohol consumption practices

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal article

E-pub ahead of print
<mark>Journal publication date</mark>11/11/2019
<mark>Journal</mark>Critical Public Health
Number of pages23
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print
Early online date11/11/19
Original languageEnglish

Abstract

Developing a deep and contextualised understanding of risk is important for public health responses to young people’s alcohol consumption, which is frequently positioned as an outcome of risky behaviour. This paper expands conceptualisations of risk to encompass its wider social and cultural context through a social practice exploration of young people’s controlled and managed intoxicated alcohol consumption practice. We report data from a fourteen-month qualitative study of the alcohol consumption practices of 23 young people in England, drawing on group interviews and social media interactions. Our findings provide a nuanced understanding of risk-taking, demonstrating that risk is an important aspect of the ongoing participation and performance in alcohol consumption practice and that health information and advice can be and was frequently incorporated into drinking practice without contributing to fundamental change. This raises new questions about the effectiveness of health interventions that focus on the individual, discussed in the final section of the paper.

Bibliographic note

This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Critical Public Health on 11/11/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09581596.2019.1686460