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  • Health and Wellbeing: Challenging Co- Design for Difficult Conversations, Successes and Failures of the Leapfrog Approach

    Rights statement: This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Design Journal on 31/05/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439

    Accepted author manuscript, 6.63 MB, PDF document

    Embargo ends: 30/11/20

    Available under license: CC BY-NC: Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License

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Health and Wellbeing: Challenging Co- Design for Difficult Conversations, Successes and Failures of the Leapfrog Approach

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Health and Wellbeing : Challenging Co- Design for Difficult Conversations, Successes and Failures of the Leapfrog Approach. / Whitham, Roger; Cruickshank, Leon; Coupe, Gemma; Wareing, Laura; Pérez, David.

In: The Design Journal, Vol. 22, No. Suppl. 1, 31.05.2019, p. 575-587.

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@article{6eb165a3a6664927996653e176e89ecd,
title = "Health and Wellbeing: Challenging Co- Design for Difficult Conversations, Successes and Failures of the Leapfrog Approach",
abstract = "Conversations are an everyday element of health and social care practice,and improving them could lead to widespread positive impacts on care provision. We present three initiatives to improve difficult conversation through three case studies, each using co-design to produce tools for later use by practitioners. The approach taken is knowingly risky, as tools can be difficult to co-design and difficult to encourage others to use, leading to failures as well as successes. Alongside specific empirical insights from the case studies we discuss the benefits of co-designing flexible tools for ongoing use and adaptation by practitioners, and the implications of this approach for the sustainability and impact of co-design initiatives.",
author = "Roger Whitham and Leon Cruickshank and Gemma Coupe and Laura Wareing and David P{\'e}rez",
note = "This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Design Journal on 31/05/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439",
year = "2019",
month = may
day = "31",
doi = "10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
pages = "575--587",
journal = "The Design Journal",
issn = "1460-6925",
publisher = "ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD",
number = "Suppl. 1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health and Wellbeing

T2 - Challenging Co- Design for Difficult Conversations, Successes and Failures of the Leapfrog Approach

AU - Whitham, Roger

AU - Cruickshank, Leon

AU - Coupe, Gemma

AU - Wareing, Laura

AU - Pérez, David

N1 - This is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in The Design Journal on 31/05/2019, available online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439

PY - 2019/5/31

Y1 - 2019/5/31

N2 - Conversations are an everyday element of health and social care practice,and improving them could lead to widespread positive impacts on care provision. We present three initiatives to improve difficult conversation through three case studies, each using co-design to produce tools for later use by practitioners. The approach taken is knowingly risky, as tools can be difficult to co-design and difficult to encourage others to use, leading to failures as well as successes. Alongside specific empirical insights from the case studies we discuss the benefits of co-designing flexible tools for ongoing use and adaptation by practitioners, and the implications of this approach for the sustainability and impact of co-design initiatives.

AB - Conversations are an everyday element of health and social care practice,and improving them could lead to widespread positive impacts on care provision. We present three initiatives to improve difficult conversation through three case studies, each using co-design to produce tools for later use by practitioners. The approach taken is knowingly risky, as tools can be difficult to co-design and difficult to encourage others to use, leading to failures as well as successes. Alongside specific empirical insights from the case studies we discuss the benefits of co-designing flexible tools for ongoing use and adaptation by practitioners, and the implications of this approach for the sustainability and impact of co-design initiatives.

U2 - 10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439

DO - 10.1080/14606925.2019.1595439

M3 - Journal article

VL - 22

SP - 575

EP - 587

JO - The Design Journal

JF - The Design Journal

SN - 1460-6925

IS - Suppl. 1

ER -