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Impact of the primary network activity on the maximum achievable capacity of DS-CDMA/OFDM spectrum sharing

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Publication date2008
Host publicationVehicular Technology Conference, 2008. VTC 2008-Fall. IEEE 68th
Place of PublicationNew York
PublisherIEEE
Pages1248-1252
Number of pages5
ISBN (Electronic)9781424417216
ISBN (Print)9781424417223
Original languageEnglish
Event68th IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference - Calgary, Canada
Duration: 21/09/200824/09/2008

Conference

Conference68th IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference
CountryCanada
Period21/09/0824/09/08

Publication series

NameIEEE VTS Vehicular Technology Conference Proceedings
PublisherIEEE
ISSN (Print)1090-3038

Conference

Conference68th IEEE Vehicular Technology Conference
CountryCanada
Period21/09/0824/09/08

Abstract

In this paper, we analyze DS-CDMA/OFDM spectrum sharing system based on opportunistic spectrum access (OSA). In this system, the primary network air interface is based on DS-CDMA, in which the system performance is limited by a maximum total received interference. The total interference, among other things, is a function of the primary users' communication activity. In OSA, part of this interference is considered to be created by the secondary service, this portion is called interference threshold. Decreasing the activity of the primary users results in a higher interference threshold, and at the same time, creates less interference at the secondary service receiver; thus the achievable capacity of the secondary service is increased. In this paper, we analytically obtain the maximum achievable capacity of the secondary service over fading channel. Our analysis reveals the dependency of the achievable capacity and the users' activity in the primary network. A direct consequence of our analysis is that exploiting the temporal variations of the available radio resource caused by the users' activity in the primary network can significantly increase the maximum achievable capacity. Simulation results confirm our analysis.